St. Mary’s Virginity

ST. MARY’S VIRGINITY Aaron’s rod, in fact, is Mary. It is a type of her virginity. She conceived and bore the Son of the Most High, the Word, without human seed. Theotokia[1] of Sunday. Biblical Reality The virginity of St. Mary is not a matter of her own private life, but rather a ‘biblical reality’, […]

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Our New Eve

OUR NEW EVE Hail to Mary, the Mother of all the living, we ask you to intercede on our behalf. Theotokia of Tuesday. New Eve: The Church calls St. Mary, “the mother of all the living”, “mother of the New Life” and “the Second Eve”. Eve lost the meaning due to her name:- “mother of […]

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Scetis

SCETIS A name that historically designated the area of monastic settlement extending about 19 miles (30 km) through the shallow valley known in the medieval period as Wad Habb, now called Wad al-Natrun, which runs southeast to northwest through the Western or Libyan Desert, about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the Nile Delta. In […]

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Henoticon

HENOTICON When Emperor Zeno returned to Constantinople in 482, he issued his famous Henoticon to the Christians of the world in Alexandria, Egypt, Libya, and Pentapolis. In it, he confirmed the faith of the Fathers of the Councils of Nicaea and Constantinople; nothing, however, is mentioned concerning the Councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon. Zeno condemned […]

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Theology In The Coptic Church

THEOLOGY IN THE COPTIC CHURCH It is hard to talk about a specifically Coptic theology, for the Coptic Church is part of the Eastern Christian Church. Thus, in order to define the development of Coptic theological thought, it is important to put it in the context of the historical development of the Coptic Church. Nothing […]

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Third Council Of Ephesus (476)

THIRD COUNCIL OF EPHESUS (476) After the death of Emperor Leo I (457-474), his two successors, Basilicus the Usurper (474-475) and Zeno (474-475, 476-491), intervened in the conflict between the supporters and the opponents of the Council of Chalcedon. In 468, an anti-Chalcedonian delegation of Egyptian monks and clergy sought to recall Timothy Aelurus, Bishop […]

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Saint Silvanus Of Scetis

SAINT SILVANUS OF SCETIS A native of Palestine who was a monk at SCETIS in the late fourth century (feast day: 1 Baramudah). He was looked upon as one of the old men and had twelve disciples, among whom, according to the APOPHTHEGMATA PATRUM (PG. 65, cols. 408-412; cf. col. 176), were Zeno (Zeno 1), […]

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Dayr Anba Maqar

DAYR ANBA MAQAR Rising on the desert horizon like a great fortress, the Monastery of Saint MACARIUS was originally the most remote and least accessible of the monasteries of Wadi al- Natrun. It came into being around 360 when Saint Macarius the Egyptian moved southward from the valley to escape the overcrowding of hermits. Here, […]

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Dayr Apa Jeremiah (Saqqara)

DAYR APA JEREMIAH (Saqqara) History We do not know if Jeremiah was the founder of the monastery that bears his name, or if he succeeded someone else. According to JOHN OF NIKIOU (Chronicle, chap. 89, pp. 4-14), Anastasius, the future emperor of Byzantium (491-518), visited Saint Jeremiah in his lifetime, when he himself was exiled […]

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Timothy Salofaciolus

TIMOTHY SALOFACIOLUS A Chalcedonian patriarch of Alexandria (460-482). A one-time steward of the church of Alexandria, he was consecrated patriarch after the expulsion of TIMOTHY II AELURUS (“the Cat”) in 459. His nickname may be derived from Coptic with a “dog Latin” ending meaning “wearer of a white turban” or “wobbling turban.” He was the […]

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