The History of Christianity in Egypt

The History of Christianity in Egypt THE TERM COPT COMES DIRECTLY FROM THE ARABIC QBT, which appears to derive from the Greek aigyptos (Egypt) / aigyptioi (Egyptians), a phonetic corruption of the ancient Egyptian word Hikaptah, one of the names of Memphis. Initially the word described a non-Arabic-speaking non-Muslim. By implication, a Copt was also […]

Read More

Church Of Abu Sayfayn (Old Cairo)

CHURCH OF ABU SAYFAYN (Old Cairo) In the Arabic manuscripts this church is called “church of Abu Marqurah,” and in a Garshuni manuscript (Arabic written in Syriac characters) “church of Mar Quryus” (Mercurius). Two late Coptic manuscripts describe it thus: “Mercurius at the tetrapylon of the river.” Western travelers of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries […]

Read More

Cheirotonia

CHEIROTONIA The practice of simony. The biblical passage cited by the Coptic jurists condemning the practice of the cheirotonia or simony is recorded by Saint Luke in the Acts of the Apostles 8:14-25. As the early church moved from its sectarian structure to an all-inclusive national cult, members of the hierarchy faced new problems concerning […]

Read More

Chrism

CHRISM Also known as holy Myron, the sacred oil used in anointing and in ceremonies of consecration. The tradition of using this sacred oil goes back to the Old Testament (Ex. 30) where God ordered Moses to prepare an anointing oil compounded from myrrh, cinnamon, cassia, and sweet calamus mixed with pure olive oil. It […]

Read More

Theology In The Coptic Church

THEOLOGY IN THE COPTIC CHURCH It is hard to talk about a specifically Coptic theology, for the Coptic Church is part of the Eastern Christian Church. Thus, in order to define the development of Coptic theological thought, it is important to put it in the context of the historical development of the Coptic Church. Nothing […]

Read More

First Council Of Ephesus (431)

FIRST COUNCIL OF EPHESUS (431) After the Arian crisis of the fourth century, theologians started to discuss the nature of the humanity of Christ. Among them was Apollinarius of Laodicia, one of the participants of the Council of Nicaea, who suggested that if Jesus is the true God then he could not be a perfect […]

Read More

Saint Cyril I Or Cyril Of Alexandria

SAINT CYRIL I or Cyril of Alexandria The twenty-fourth patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (412-444), who is reckoned one of the greatest prelates of Christian antiquity (feast day: 3 Abib). Cyril spent his early years at Dayr Anba Maqar in the Nitrian Valley, which had become noted as a center of theological studies. […]

Read More

Council Of Chalcedon

COUNCIL OF CHALCEDON After the death of the Emperor Theodosius II in 450, his sister Pulcheria married Marcian, who accordingly became emperor. The new imperial officials convoked a council at Chalcedon in order to see to the matters of the Eutychians and the Nestorians. As a result of this council, the Coptic patriarch Dioscorus was […]

Read More

Dayr Anba Helias

DAYR ANBA HELIAS A twelfth-century Ethiopian monastery in Wadi al-Natrun. In all the documents that concern this monastery, it is linked with the presence of Ethiopian monks. It is not that no other Ethiopian monks lived in other places in Wadi al-Natrun, but this monastery appears to have been populated exclusively by Ethiopians. The presence […]

Read More

Codex Theodosianus

CODEX THEODOSIANUS A Roman imperial law code, published on 15 February 438 on the authority of Emperor Theodosius II, with a covering constitution addressed to the pretorian prefect of the East (Novella Theodosiana I). It had been approved by the Western emperor, Valentinian III, during his stay in Constantinople in October 437 when he married […]

Read More