Copto-Arabic Studies Bibliography

COPTO-ARABIC STUDIES BIBLIOGRAPHY General References (Referred to Below in Abbreviated Fashion) Atiya, Aziz Suryal, ed. The Coptic Encyclopedia, 8 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1991. A standard tool in English. (CE) Gibb, H. A. R. et al., eds. The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new ed., 11 vols. Leiden: Brill, 1954-. Some articles are of importance to Copto-Arabic […]

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Pachomius and the White Monastery

Pachomius and the White Monastery IN THE fiRST volume of the Oxford History of the Christian Church, entitled The Church in Ancient Society: From Galilee to Gregory the Great and published in 2001, Henry Chadwick included the following brief paragraph on Shenoute in his chapter on “Monks: The Ascetic Life.” In the fifth century the […]

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John of Shmoun and Coptic Identity

John of Shmoun and Coptic Identity After the Council of Chalcedon in ad 451 and in particular after the Arab conquest of Egypt in ad 641, the need to demonstrate Coptic self­ identification became more important than before.[1] Usually, there is the need to stress one’s identity and define or form its features when one […]

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The Place of Qusqam in the Textual Data on the Flight into Egypt

The Place of Qusqam in the Textual Data on the Flight into Egypt Dayr al-Muharraq is for Christian Egyptians a very blessed place— maybe the most blessed place in Egypt. Tens of thousands of people come here every year on special feasts and occasions: not only for the feast of the Assumption of the Virgin […]

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Liturgy of the Monastery of al-Muharraq

Liturgy of the Monastery of al-Muharraq The Monastery of al-Muharraq has special peculiarities in its liturgical practice.[1] For example, the term used there for ‘hymn’ is different from all other manuscripts: luhunat, rather than alhan. There are even differences in the musical instruments, as the monks of the Monastery of al-Muharraq use, in addition to […]

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The History of Christianity in Egypt

The History of Christianity in Egypt THE TERM COPT COMES DIRECTLY FROM THE ARABIC QBT, which appears to derive from the Greek aigyptos (Egypt) / aigyptioi (Egyptians), a phonetic corruption of the ancient Egyptian word Hikaptah, one of the names of Memphis. Initially the word described a non-Arabic-speaking non-Muslim. By implication, a Copt was also […]

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The Church of St. Mercurius (OLD CAIRO)

The Church of St. Mercurius (OLD CAIRO) THE CHURCH OF ST. MERCURIUS is part of a complex of three churches and a convent, also dedicated to St. Mercurius (Abu Sayfayn). St. Mercurius, “the Father of the Two Swords,” was a commander in the army of the Emperor Decius (249-251). On the eve of an important […]

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The Church of St. Barbara (OLD CAIRO)

The Church of St. Barbara (OLD CAIRO) Athanasius of Edessa, scribe (katib) of amir zAbd al-Aziz ibn Marwan (685-705) founded a second church in Old Cairo, known as the Church of St. Barbara. Because of their similar architecture, Sts. Sergius and Bacchus and St. Barbara are often considered ‘twin churches’ or ‘sister churches.’ Originally, the […]

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Sunday

SUNDAY The weekly commemoration of the Resurrection and appearance of the Lord to His disciples (Jn. 20:19, 26). It falls on the first day of every week. Sunday has been kept by Christians since apostolic times as a day of joyful worship. Saint Paul and the Christians of Troas gathered on the first day of […]

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