Spanish

Ashkenazim

Ashkenazim pl. n. Hebrew (osh-keh-NAH-zeem) The name given to the group of Jews who were originally from Germany and France (and their descendants). The word Ashkenaz is the Hebrew name for Germany. The Ashkenazim migrated to Central and Eastern Europe during times of oppression. In pre-World War II Europe, Ashkenazim comprised 90 percent of world …

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anusim

anusim pl. n. Hebrew (ah-noo-SEEM) Literally, “compelled ones.” The historical term for Jews who were forced to convert to another religion. The anusim often tried secretly to preserve their Jewish customs and teach them to their children. Perhaps the most famous anusim are the Spanish and Portuguese Jews who were compelled to convert to Christianity …

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Alef Bet

Alef Bet n. Hebrew (AH-lef BET) A name for the Hebrew alphabet, formed from its first two letters: alef and bet. Using the term “Alef Bet” is comparable to calling the English alphabet the “ABCs.” The alphabet consists of 22 consonants and five final letters. The 10 vowels in Hebrew, which are indicated by seven …

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Bawit in the Twenty-first Century: Bibliography 1997-2014

Bawit in the Twenty-first Century: Bibliography 1997-2014 Since the rediscovery of the Bawit monastery in 1900, numerous investigations have covered diverse fields of research. Marie-Helene Rutschowscaya established a bibliography of the main titles, following the chronological order of publication: Rutschowscaya, M.-H. 1995. “Le monastere de Baouit. Etat des publica­tions.” In C. Fluck, L. Langener, S. …

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Cyprus

CYPRUS According to the traveler Iohann van Kootwyck, who visited Cyprus in 1598-1599, Copts, as well as other Oriental Christians, arrived there as fugitives after the capture of Jerusalem by Saladin in 1187. In 1342, the Spanish Dominican Alphonse Bonhome referred to an Arabic Life of St. Antony that he found at a Coptic monastery …

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