SAMU’IL OF QALAMUN

Tuma Ibn Al-Najib Lutfallah

TUMA IBN AL-NAJIB LUTFALLAH A fourteenth-century monk known from two manuscripts that he copied. Tuma’s name is given in two colophons of Vatican Arabic 158 with the addition “known as (al-ma‘ruf bi-) al-Mahalli,” which suggests he came from al-Mahallah in the Delta. The same colophons also record that he was a monk at the monastery …

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Wadi Al-Rayyan (Fayyum)

WADI AL-RAYYAN (Fayyum) A valley (wadi) connected to the great depression of the Fayyum, of which it forms an extension to the southwest with Wadi al-Muwaylih, where DAYR ANBA SAMU’IL of QALAMUN is situated. There are three wells and a small grove of palms; it is frequented by the camel caravans that link the Fayyum …

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Archimandrite

ARCHIMANDRITE A term of Greek origin (archein, to rule, and mandra, fold, byre) denoting the superior of a monastery. Although its precise application is the subject of controversy, one thing is certain: it was a higher-ranking term than others such as father, PROESTOS, and HEGUMENOS. The title “archimandrite” emerged in the Syrian and Mesopotamian regions …

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Birma

BIRMA A town located in the Egyptian Delta about 7 miles (11 km) northwest of Tanta in the province of Gharbiyyah. Although Birma is listed in a number of Coptic-Arabic scales and in a list of Egyptian bishoprics (Munier, 1943, p. 64), the town is rarely referred to in Christian-Arabic literature and no bishop for …

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Takinash (Bani Suef)

TAKINASH (Bani Suef) A monastery mentioned several times in the Life of SAMU’IL OF QALAMUN. Driven from Scetis by the envoy of Cyrus, the Chalcedonian archbishop of Alexandria, Samu’il withdrew with his disciples to the south, to the mountain of Takinash. After being delivered from the bedouin who had taken him prisoner, he founded Qalamun …

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Anchorite

ANCHORITE History Anchorites are those ascetic hermits who embraced the highest degree of monastic life by retreating into the Egyptian desert and living in complete seclusion and self-mortification. The annals of the Coptic church abound in names of anchorites who lived between the third and seventh centuries. An anchorite could spend many decades in caves …

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