Sahidic

Drescher, James Anthony Bede (1902-1985)

DRESCHER, JAMES ANTHONY BEDE (1902-1985) A frequent contributor to the Bulletin de la Société d’archéologie copte. He was also the editor and translator of Three Coptic Legends: Hilaria, Archellites, The Seven Sleepers (Cairo, 1947) and The Coptic (Sahidic) Version of Kingdoms I, II (Samuel I, II), CSCO 313-314 (Louvain, 1970). MIRRIT BOUTROS GHALI Tags: Eminent

Akhmim

AKHMIM A city on the right bank of the Nile, about 250 miles (467 km) south of Cairo. In Byzantine times Akhmim was known as Panopolis. It remains today the chief town of the province of Suhaj. Akhmim is the name of pharaonic times (Chemmis) clothed in Arabic. Monasteries Pachomian Establishments The Greek and Coptic …

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Acts Of The Apostles

ACTS OF THE APOSTLES Coptic literature is particularly rich in so-called apocryphal texts. This is especially noticeable in the documents dealing with the apostles. The source of this phenomenon may be ascribed to the spirit of patriotism prevailing among the Copts or to the tradition of legendary and fictitious forms so commonly used in the …

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Dayr Al-Bisrah (Busrah)

DAYR AL-BISRAH (Busrah) History Dayr al-Bisrah is a small Coptic village on the right bank of the Nile, south of the extremity of the basin of Abnub, at the place where the mountains are very close to the Nile, opposite Shut b, the homeland of the father of Saint THEODORUS “the General” (stratelates) according to …

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Acacius, Bishop Of Caesarea

ACACIUS, BISHOP OF CAESAREA To whom a Coptic Encomium of the Martyr Mercurius (of Caesarea of Cappadocia) is attributed. Some ambiguity exists concerning this attribution, for, whereas patrologists recognize only one Acacius, bishop of Caesarea in Palestine (340-366), Coptic literature makes mention of another Acacius in Dioscorus’ Encomium of Macarius of Tkow. The first-named Acacius …

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Abbot

ABBOT. In the ancient monastic sources (APOPHTHEGMATA PATRUM, HISTORIA MONACHORUM IN AEGYPTO, PALLADIUS Historia Lausiaca, etc.), the name of a monk is generally preceded by the Greek word abbas or abba, the cognate of the Coptic apa (Sahidic) or abba (Bohairic), the Arabic aba or anba. This is clearly the Aramaic and Syriac ab in …

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