Sahidic manuscript

Coptic Dialects

COPTIC DIALECTS There are six main dialects: Sahidic, Bohairic, Fayumic, Oxyrhynchite (Middle Egyptian), Akhmimic, and Lycopolitan (Subakhmimic). The number of Coptic dialects has increased with the discovery of more Coptic manuscripts and the intensive research in Coptic dialects, especially in the second half of the 20th century. However, locating the dialects geographically remains a matter …

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Theotokia

THEOTOKIA Part of the Psalmodia service. According to Abu al-Barakat ibn Kabar, in his encyclopedia The Lamp of Darkness for the Explanation of the Service, the compiler of the Theotokia was a virtuous potter who became a monk in Scetis. He adds that some people consider St. Athanasius to be the author of the Theotokia. …

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Timothy II

TIMOTHY II A Saint and patriarch. He was the 26th Patriarch of Alexandria (457-477). He is commemorated on the seventh of Misra. He was commonly known as Timothy Aelurus. He became patriarch after the murder of the Chalcedonian Patriarch Proterius (451-457). He was deposed and exiled several times. Even during his exile, he remained the …

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Saint Herai

SAINT HERAI A fourth-century virgin martyr in Egypt (feast day: 14 Tubah); she is briefly mentioned also in the Greek calendar (5 and 23 September). The legendary Passion of Herai survives in a single Sahidic manuscript (Egyptian Museum, Turin, cat. 63000, III. 65-72), which is now incomplete. The missing portions can be reconstructed from the …

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Saint Justus

SAINT JUSTUS A martyr in fourth-century Egypt. Justin is related to the Antiochene cycle concerning the family of the Roman general BASILIDES (see CYCLES). His Passion was presumably written later, when the descriptive elements of the cycle were already much developed and the kinships among people were very elaborate. The Passion was handed down through …

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Apocryphal Literature

APOCRYPHAL LITERATURE Properly speaking, this consists of the so-called Old Testament pseudepigrapha. The Old Testament books called “apocryphal” by Protestants and “deuterocanonical” by Roman Catholics were until recently included in the biblical canon of the Coptic church. Only at the beginning of the twentieth century and by order of CYRIL V (1874-1927) were the following …

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