Roman period

ALEXANDRIA (Ἀλεξάνδρια)

ALEXANDRIA (Ἀλεξάνδρια) The city of Alexandria almost realized Alexander the Great’s dream of ‘a city surpassing anything previously existing’ (Plutarch, Alex. xxvi.). Planned by Dinocrates under the king’s supervision, and built on a neck of land two miles wide interposed between the Mediterranean Sea and Lake Mareotis (Mariut), about 14 miles from the Canopic mouth …

ALEXANDRIA (Ἀλεξάνδρια) Read More »

Snapshots on the Sculptural Heritage of the White Monastery at Sohag: The Wall Niches

Snapshots on the Sculptural Heritage of the White Monastery at Sohag: The Wall Niches THE SCULPTURAL REMAINS of both monastic churches in the Sohag region, the so-called Red and White Monasteries (Dayr al-Ahmar and Dayr al-Abyad)[1], is of great importance with regard to our absolutely insufficient knowledge of Coptic architectural sculpture in general.[2] It is …

Snapshots on the Sculptural Heritage of the White Monastery at Sohag: The Wall Niches Read More »

Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community

Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community Al-Shaykh Sa‘id (Middle Egypt) covers the southern part of the archaeo­logical concession area of the Dayr al-Barsha Project (Research Group Egyptology, KU Leuven),[1] directed by Harco Willems.[2] The site is named after the nearby tomb of a local saint. An ensemble of …

Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community Read More »

Coptic Toponymy

COPTIC TOPONYMY The study of ancient place-names is one of the most interesting domains of historical research, since the names of hamlets, villages, and towns of the past often give brief but valuable indications, usually absent from historical records, about the creation of those urban centers and the reasons for their founding, whether economic, political, …

Coptic Toponymy Read More »

Coptic Ceramics

COPTIC CERAMICS The pottery produced in Egypt from the late Roman to the early Islamic period. There must be no illusion about the term “Coptic ceramics.” The techniques of production were in the tradition of Hellenistic and Roman techniques. Similarly, there is no marked stylistic discontinuity between the products of the Roman period and those …

Coptic Ceramics Read More »