Renunciation

ABSTINENCE

ABSTINENCE Introduction.—The whole of morality on its negative side may be included under Abstinence. Christian moral progress (sanctification) includes a holding fast (κατέχεσθαι) of the good, and an abstaining from (ἀπέχεσθαι) every form of evil (1 Th 5:21f.). While Christianity has general laws to distinguish the good from the bad, yet for each individual Christian …

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ABRAHAM (Ἀβραάμ)

ABRAHAM (Ἀβραάμ) Addressing a Jewish crowd in the precincts of the Temple, St. Peter emphasizes the connexion between the Hebrew and the Christian religion by proclaiming that ‘the God of Abraham … hath glorified his servant (παῖδα; cf. RVm) Jesus’ (Ac 3:13). This Divine title, which is similarly used in St. Stephen’s speech (7:32), was …

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Figures in the Carpet and Monastic Spirituality in the Wadi al-Natrun (Scetis)

Figures in the Carpet: Macarius the Great, Isaiah of Scetis, Daniel of Scetis, and Monastic Spirituality in the Wadi al-Natrun (Scetis) From the Fourth to the Sixth Century Not many years ago I read a very good scholarly book on Palestinian monasticism in Late Antiquity. In my review of that book I observed, however, that …

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”Do Not Believe Every Word like the Fool . . . !” Rhetorical Strategies in Shenoute, Canon 6

”Do Not Believe Every Word like the Fool . . . !” Rhetorical Strategies in Shenoute, Canon 6 ST. SHENOUTE (flORUIT ~A.D. 385–465) is the major Coptic writer of the late fourth and fifth centuries. The idea of producing texts in Coptic was not his invention, but he brought the language to a peak of …

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“Twenty Thousand Nuns” The Domestic Virgins of Oxyrhynchos

“Twenty Thousand Nuns” The Domestic Virgins of Oxyrhynchos Historia Monachorum in Oxyrhynchos The Historia Monachorum in Aegypto contains a literary testimony of Chris­tians in the city of Oxyrhynchos.[1] Its anonymous author, an eyewitness from Palestine writing at the turn of the fifth century, boasts that this city in Middle Egypt abounds with monasteries, both within …

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