R. G. Coquin

Harmina, Saint

HARMINA, SAINT A wondering monk (feastday: 2 Kiyakh). Harmina was a native of the province of OXYRHYNCHUS (al-Bahnasa), and the son of Christian parents. When he was an adolescent and watching his parents’ flocks, the apostles John and Peter appeared to him to invite him to embrace the monastic life. Following them, he went up …

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Coptic Medical Papyri

COPTIC MEDICAL PAPYRI Among the voluminous Coptic medical literature, only remnants have survived, as is shown by the high numbers of the extant numbered pages. These remnants have come down to us on parchment, on papyrus, on ostraca, on paper, and on walls (as graffiti). Except for the second parchment manuscript (see below) the texts …

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Illumination, Coptic

ILLUMINATION, COPTIC. The painted decoration, or illumination, of Coptic books, appears to have had its origin in pharaonic Egypt. Numerous examples from the Eighteenth Dynasty onward grace funerary texts and the papyri that accompanied mummies in their sarcophagi. Though one might think that the tradition would have been prolonged right down to the Coptic period, …

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Inscriptions

INSCRIPTIONS Writing on long-lasting materials. Inscriptions, like texts written on papyrus (see PAPYROLOGY), are important primary sources of information about a society. In Egypt they appear on stone, plaster, clay, wood, metal, and textiles. They may be scratched, carved, engraved, stamped, painted or inked, or woven. Those written on clay sherds or limestone fragments are …

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