qummus

Notes on the Arabic Life of Ibrahim al-Fani: A Coptic Saint of the Fourteenth Century

Notes on the Arabic Life of Ibrahim al-Fani: A Coptic Saint of the Fourteenth Century The Lives of Coptic saints in the later Islamic era fall into the category of sacred biographies that have not attracted much study until recently.[1] This observation does not imply that these Lives have little or no historical or lit­erary …

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Hegumen

HEGUMEN Today hegumenos means “abbot,” or the head of a monastery. The hegumenos is usually chosen by the monks from their own community and approved by the patriarch, metropolitan, or bishop within whose jurisdiction the monastery lies. The hegumenate is the highest rank of the priesthood to which priests, married or celibate, serving in cathedrals …

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Sarjiyus, Malati

SARJIYUS, MALATI (1883-1964) An Egyptian clergyman better known as Qummus Sarjiyus. He was born in Jirja, in Upper Egypt, with a long line of clerical ancestors behind him. Sarjiyus joined the CLERICAL COLLEGE in 1899 and graduated with a distinguished record that qualified him to teach in the same college. His revolutionary tendencies, which characterized …

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Yusab

YUSAB The fifteenth-century bishop of Akhmim. It is not certain if a Yusab, bishop of Akhmim, ever existed in the fifteenth century, as no lists of Coptic bishops from this century exist. However, in 1938 P. Sbath mentioned four works attributed to a certain Yusab, bishop of Akhmim, in various manuscripts, stating he was a …

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Yu’annis

YU’ANNIS The thirteenth-century (?) bishop of Asyut, known for having edited the panegyric of the martyrs of Isna who died under Maximian (286-310): Saint Dilaji and her four children, Eusebius and his brothers, as well as their companions. The panegyric occupies 182 pages, with twelve lines per page. It is found in at least three …

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Ethiopian Synaxarion

ETHIOPIAN SYNAXARION There are two reasons for an article on the Ethiopic Synaxarion to be in a Coptic encyclopedia: first, the Ethiopic Synaxarion contains historical notices about Egypt—for example, the patriarchs or the churches of Old Cairo, based on lost documents; and, second, the Egyptian edition of the Coptic SYNAXARION by the qummus ‘Abd al-Masih …

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