Photius

Manichaeism and Gnosticism in the Panopolitan Region between Lykopolis and Nag Hammadi

Manichaeism and Gnosticism in the Panopolitan Region between Lykopolis and Nag Hammadi TO DEAL WITH the religious movements of Manichaeism and Gnosticism in the area of Sohag presents a good many problems and raises several ques­tions that will perhaps never be answered. This fact depends on our lack of evidence concerning these two strong ‘enemies’ …

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Theology And Liturgy Bibliography

THEOLOGY AND LITURGY BIBLIOGRAPHY Abdallah, Alfonso. L’ordinamento Liturgico di Gabriele V-88 Patriarca Copto. Cairo: Ain Shams Press, 1962. ‘Abd al-Masih Salib al-Mas‘udi. Al-Khuulaji al-Muqaddas. Cairo: n.p., 1902. Alcock, Antony. The Life of Saint Samuel of Kalamun by Isaac the Presbyter. London: Aris & Philips, 1983. Allen, Pauline, and C. Datema. “Leontius presbyter of Constantinople.” Byzantina …

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Filioque

FILIOQUE Latin, meaning “and [from] the son.” In the sixth century, Arian barbarians (Goth and Visigoth) invaded the western empire and introduced many heretical dogmas and expressions. In 589 a.d., the Council of Toledo included details in the Nicene Creed concerning the procession of the Holy Spirit from the Father and the Son in order …

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Theophilus

THEOPHILUS The twenty-third patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (385-412). A complex and controversial patriarch, Theophilus was much admired for his many writings, his destruction of pagan temples and subsequent church-building program, as well as his important role as a mediator of schisms at Antioch, Bostra, and Jerusalem during the early part of his …

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Asyut

ASYUT A city on the west bank of the Nile in middle Egypt. The Greeks called the city lÚkwn pÒlij, Lúkon pólis (Lycopolis, “wolf city”) because of the citizens’ reverence for Wepwawet, the wolf god. Asyut, the city’s modern Arabic name, is derived from the Coptic cioout. Lycopolis, home of a Christian community since at …

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Alexander Of Lycopolis

ALEXANDER OF LYCOPOLIS A Neoplatonist philosopher (c. A.D. 300). Photius of Constantinople indicates (Contra Manichaeos 1. 11) that he converted to Christianity and became archbishop of Lycopolis. He is known through his De placitis Manichaeorum, which shows him as a coolheaded critic of the teaching being spread in Egypt by Manichaean missionaries in the first …

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Amphilochius Of Iconium

AMPHILOCHIUS OF ICONIUM Some scholars have thought that Amphilochius of Iconium deserves to rank alongside BASIL THE GREAT of Caesarea, GREGORY OF NYSSA, and GREGORY OF NAZIANZUS as the fourth great Cappadocian of the end of the fourth century. Educated at the school of Libanius at Antioch, then an advocate in Constantinople, Amphilochius was invited …

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