Phoibammon

The Monastery of Apa Thomas at Wadi Sarga: Points of Departure for a Relative Chronology

The Monastery of Apa Thomas at Wadi Sarga: Points of Departure for a Relative Chronology This chapter discusses the identification of the superiors of the Monas­tery of Apa Thomas at Wadi Sarga and presents some points of departure for reconstructing a relative chronology of this monastic community on the basis of Coptic epitaphs and documents.[1] …

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Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community

Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community Al-Shaykh Sa‘id (Middle Egypt) covers the southern part of the archaeo­logical concession area of the Dayr al-Barsha Project (Research Group Egyptology, KU Leuven),[1] directed by Harco Willems.[2] The site is named after the nearby tomb of a local saint. An ensemble of …

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State Museum Of Berlin

STATE MUSEUM OF BERLIN The Coptic collection of the Staatliche Museen in East Berlin is one of the most extensive and most important outside Egypt. It contains some 2,000 works of all kinds. Its origin is closely connected with the building up of a section for Early Christian and Byzantine works of art; from about …

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Dayr Apa Phoibammon

DAYR APA PHOIBAMMON History The monastery of Phoibammon is situated between MADINAT HABU and Armant, at the end of a narrow wadi ending in a circular cliff about 80 feet (25 m) high. It was excavated in 1947 and 1948 by Charles Bachatly, secretary-general of the SOCIETY OF COPTIC ARCHAEOLOGY. Graffiti on the cliff face …

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Dayr Epiphanius

DAYR EPIPHANIUS A small semi-anchoritic community that existed around 580-640 on the “Holy Hill of Djeme” (Madinat Habu) in Western Thebes in Upper Egypt. The hermits who dwelled there had, like those in Kellia, Nitria, and Scetis, formed a laura around the cell of a Monophysite Coptic anchorite. In this case, it was Epiphanius who …

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Dayr Al-Bakhit (Luxor)

DAYR AL-BAKHIT (Luxor) History The name of this monastery could only be the Arabic transcription of a Coptic word meaning “of the north,” in contrast to Dayr al-Qibli (Monastery of the South), the name given to the temple of Hadrian to the south of Madinat Habu. This appellation could be older than the typically Arabic …

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Wadi Shaykh ‘Ali

WADI SHAYKH ‘ALI A rather narrow and inaccessible ravine running roughly north-south into the Dishna plain in the area of Nag Hammadi in Upper Egypt; it apparently was named after the nearby village of Shaykh ‘Ali. Opening off the northwestern perimeter of the desert and flanked by the Jabal al-Tarif to the west and the …

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Archives

ARCHIVES There were already archives in Egypt in the pre-Christian period, according to Helck (1975). In Christian times, too, there were official and semiofficial Greek archives: those of soldiers, priests, manual workers, and other private individuals. An attempt to reassemble such archives was announced by Heichelheim in 1932. In these archives documents were preserved, in …

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Al-Shaykh Sa‘Id

AL-SHAYKH SA‘ID Less than 2 miles (about 3 km) south of the village of al-Barsha, on the right bank of the Nile, are some tombs from ancient Egypt, known as the tombs of al-Shaykh Sa‘id. They were later fitted up as dwellings, like those of Bani Hasan, and one of them served as a chapel. …

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