Coptic art in the Coptic museum

Coptic art in the Coptic museum Coptic art began to emerge in Egypt around 300 A.D. In form, style, and content it was quite different from the art of Pharaonic Egypt. How’ did this come about? Broadly speaking, there were two causes. The first is that indigenous Egyptian art had been in contact with the […]

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Al-Ashmunayn (MINYA)

Al-Ashmunayn (MINYA) LATE ANTIQUE hermopolis MAGNA (modern al-Ashmunayn) was an important administrative center in Middle Egypt, with a long history. In pharaonic times, one of the largest temples in honor of Thot, the ibis-headed god, scribe, and vizier of the gods, was built here. The Arabic al-Ashmunayn derives from the Egyptian name of the city. […]

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The Monastery of Durunka (ASYUT)

The Monastery of Durunka (ASYUT) Just after they had lived six months in the place that was to become Dayr al-Muharraq, an angel brought the Holy Family the message that Herod had died and that it was safe to return to Palestine. According to tradition, attested to by medieval manuscripts, they traveled by boat. The […]

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The Monastery of al-Ganadla (ASYUT)

The Monastery of al-Ganadla (ASYUT) THE MONASTERY OF AL-GANADLA, also called the Monastery of the Virgin (Dayr al-‘Adra), was established in pharaonic quarries to the west of the village of al-Ganadla, about 25 kilometers south of Asyut. It is often confused with the Monastery of St. Macrobius (Dayr Abu Maqrufa), a nearby laura dedicated to […]

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The White Monastery (SOHAG)

The White Monastery (SOHAG)  SHENUTE OF ATRIPE (d. ca. 465) was five or seven years old when his father entrusted him to his maternal uncle, the monk St. Bigul. After a vision that the boy would be a great leader of men, St. Bigul made him a monk and kept him with him. Shenute […]

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An illuminated liturgical manuscript.

The Monasteries of Naqada (NAQADA)

The Monasteries of Naqada (NAQADA) SIX MONASTIC SETTLEMENTS SURVIVE TO THE SOUTHWEST OF NAQADA at the edge of the cultivated land and the desert. They trace their roots to the sixth century, when the area, known as the Mountain of Benhadab or Tsenti, was populated with hermits and small monasteries. Traditionally, St. Pisentius (569-632) is […]

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The Monastery at Qubbat al-Hawwa (ASWAN)

The Monastery at Qubbat al-Hawwa (ASWAN)   SOME SIX KILOMETERS NORTH of the Monastery of St. Hatre (Hedra), pharaonic tombs for the governors of Aswan were cut into the cliff. Around these tombs, the monastic settlement of Qubbat al-Hawwa developed. It is named after the tomb of a shaykh who was buried nearby. The original […]

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The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts

The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts Dayr al-Bala’iza, situated at the edge of the desert on the west bank of the Nile some eighteen to nineteen kilometers south of Asyut, gained initial recognition among Coptic scholars through the large cache of manuscripts, both literary and documentary, discovered at the site during […]

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John of Shmoun and Coptic Identity

John of Shmoun and Coptic Identity After the Council of Chalcedon in ad 451 and in particular after the Arab conquest of Egypt in ad 641, the need to demonstrate Coptic self­ identification became more important than before.[1] Usually, there is the need to stress one’s identity and define or form its features when one […]

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