Persian

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations Introduction Exploration of Antinoopolis—the well-known city founded by the Roman emperor Hadrian around ad 130 to honor his beloved Antinous after his legendary death in the Nile—began in the late nineteenth century.[1] In January 1896, Carl Schmidt (1868—1938), a German scholar, undertook a first small excavation in …

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Icon of the Virgin Mary and Child. Achmim area provenance. Photo­graph courtesy of Gawdat Gabra..

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1]

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1] THE LATE FOURTEENTH-century painting by Gherardo Starnina, La Tebaide in Galleria degli Uffizi in Florence, provides perhaps the last medieval visu­alized memory of the (ideal) Christian sacred landscape along the Nile in Upper Egypt, densely inhabited by hermits tending their …

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Alexandria

ALEXANDRIA Founded in 331 b.c. by Alexander the Great at the western end of the Nile Delta. An Egyptian town, Rakote, already existed there on the shore and was a fishermen’s resort. From its very beginning, Alexandria developed rapidly into one of the world’s great cities. The city replaced Memphis as the capital of Egypt …

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