Copto-Arabic Studies Bibliography

COPTO-ARABIC STUDIES BIBLIOGRAPHY General References (Referred to Below in Abbreviated Fashion) Atiya, Aziz Suryal, ed. The Coptic Encyclopedia, 8 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1991. A standard tool in English. (CE) Gibb, H. A. R. et al., eds. The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new ed., 11 vols. Leiden: Brill, 1954-. Some articles are of importance to Copto-Arabic […]

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John of Shmoun and Coptic Identity

John of Shmoun and Coptic Identity After the Council of Chalcedon in ad 451 and in particular after the Arab conquest of Egypt in ad 641, the need to demonstrate Coptic self­ identification became more important than before.[1] Usually, there is the need to stress one’s identity and define or form its features when one […]

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The History of Christianity in Egypt

The History of Christianity in Egypt THE TERM COPT COMES DIRECTLY FROM THE ARABIC QBT, which appears to derive from the Greek aigyptos (Egypt) / aigyptioi (Egyptians), a phonetic corruption of the ancient Egyptian word Hikaptah, one of the names of Memphis. Initially the word described a non-Arabic-speaking non-Muslim. By implication, a Copt was also […]

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Cosmas Indicopleustes

COSMAS INDICOPLEUSTES The name given to an anonymous Nestorian author of the twelve-book Christian Topography, written a few years before the Second Council of CONSTANTINOPLE (553). Cosmas was an Egyptian merchant, probably from Alexandria, who plied his trade in Alexandria, the Red Sea port of Adulis (Sawakin), and Ceylon (Sri Lanka), calling at the island […]

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Alexandria

ALEXANDRIA Founded in 331 b.c. by Alexander the Great at the western end of the Nile Delta. An Egyptian town, Rakote, already existed there on the shore and was a fishermen’s resort. From its very beginning, Alexandria developed rapidly into one of the world’s great cities. The city replaced Memphis as the capital of Egypt […]

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Mark

MARK The Apostle, evangelist, and saint. According to the Coptic tradition, St. Mark is the founder of the Coptic Church in Egypt. This tradition is supported by the testimony of Eusebius of Caesarea in his Church History. A Coptic manuscript preserved in Paris contains a detailed story of St. Mark. This manuscript was copied in […]

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Waq‘At Al-Kana’is (The Incident Of The Churches)

WAQ‘AT AL-KANA’IS The first demonstration of the presence of widely organized Muslim religious brotherhoods in Egypt and of their deep impact on the populace, which they manipulated in the Mamluk period. On one day in 1321, the populace, incited and led by members of these brotherhoods, destroyed, pillaged, and burned over sixty of the main […]

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Confession Of The Fathers (Ca. 1078)

CONFESSION OF THE FATHERS (ca. 1078) Patristic florilegium (literally a “selection of flowers,” like a bouquet; a chain of quotations from selected authorities). The anonymous text known as I‘tiraf al-Aba’ (Confession of the Fathers) is a patristic florilegium. Confession is significant as an assertion and defense of the one-nature (Miaphysite) Christology of the Coptic Church […]

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Holy Week

HOLY WEEK Holy Week falls between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. The first description of the rite of the Holy Week is given by Egeria, a European woman from France who visited the Holy Lands between 381and 384. She provided a detailed description of the places she visited and the ceremonies that she attended. It […]

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