The History of Christianity in Egypt

The History of Christianity in Egypt THE TERM COPT COMES DIRECTLY FROM THE ARABIC QBT, which appears to derive from the Greek aigyptos (Egypt) / aigyptioi (Egyptians), a phonetic corruption of the ancient Egyptian word Hikaptah, one of the names of Memphis. Initially the word described a non-Arabic-speaking non-Muslim. By implication, a Copt was also […]

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Theology And Liturgy Bibliography

THEOLOGY AND LITURGY BIBLIOGRAPHY Abdallah, Alfonso. L’ordinamento Liturgico di Gabriele V-88 Patriarca Copto. Cairo: Ain Shams Press, 1962. ‘Abd al-Masih Salib al-Mas‘udi. Al-Khuulaji al-Muqaddas. Cairo: n.p., 1902. Alcock, Antony. The Life of Saint Samuel of Kalamun by Isaac the Presbyter. London: Aris & Philips, 1983. Allen, Pauline, and C. Datema. “Leontius presbyter of Constantinople.” Byzantina […]

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Scetis

SCETIS A name that historically designated the area of monastic settlement extending about 19 miles (30 km) through the shallow valley known in the medieval period as Wad Habb, now called Wad al-Natrun, which runs southeast to northwest through the Western or Libyan Desert, about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the Nile Delta. In […]

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Trisagion

TRISAGION “Holy God, Holy Mighty, Holy Immortal . . . have mercy upon us.” The Trisagion was introduced into the Byzantine liturgy by Proclus of Cyzicus, who succeeded Nestorius as Bishop of Constantinople (431-446 a.d.). However, a papyrus from the fourth century preserved in the collection of the University of Strasbourg includes a Trisagion in […]

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Church Of Abu Sayfayn (Old Cairo)

CHURCH OF ABU SAYFAYN (Old Cairo) In the Arabic manuscripts this church is called “church of Abu Marqurah,” and in a Garshuni manuscript (Arabic written in Syriac characters) “church of Mar Quryus” (Mercurius). Two late Coptic manuscripts describe it thus: “Mercurius at the tetrapylon of the river.” Western travelers of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries […]

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Coptic Revolts

COPTIC REVOLTS Sources refer to a number of revolts of the Copts against Arab authorities between 693 or 694 and 832. Arab historians have seen these revolts as a reaction to the heavy taxes placed on the Copts and the deterioration of their social status under Muslim rule. The most significant revolts are those of […]

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Troparion “O Only Begotten”

TROPARION “O ONLY BEGOTTEN” O Only Begotten Son and the Word of God the immortal and everlasting, accepting everything for our salvation, was incarnated from the Theotokos the ever-Virgin Saint Mary, without change, Christ the God became Man, was crucified, through death trampled death, One of the Holy Trinity who is glorified with the Father […]

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Sawirus Ibn Al-Muqaffa‘

SAWIRUS IBN AL-MUQAFFA‘ Earliest great Coptic writer in the Arabic language. Sawirus was born early in the tenth century to a pious family that provided him with a thorough Christian education. His dates of birth and death are not known with precision, but his life must have covered most of the tenth century. His name […]

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Cosmas II (The Patriarch)

COSMAS II The fifty-fourth patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (851-858). A native of Samannud, Cosmas joined Dayr Anba Magar as a deacon and then became a presbyter. He was still there when he was summoned by the bishops, the clergy, and the archons of the city of Alexandria to occupy the throne of […]

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Dayr Anba Sawirus (Asyut)

DAYR ANBA SAWIRUS (Asyut) The most ancient attestation of this monastery appears to be the colophon of a manuscript written there between 10 November 1002 and 29 August 1003, which then passed into the library of the White Monastery (DAYR ANBA SHINUDAH) before ending up in the National Library, Paris (Copte 129:14, fol. 95; Crum, […]

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