Patriarch Gabriel

Awlad Al-‘Assal (13th C.)

AWLAD AL-‘ASSAL (13th c.) Family of scholars. The term Awlad al-‘Assal (“the children of al-‘Assal”) is conventionally used to refer to four brothers who played a major role in the revival of Coptic thought in the decades between 1230 and 1260. Their father, Fakhr al-Dawlah (“Pride of the State”) Abu al-Mufaddal al-As‘ad, was a wealthy …

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Dayr Buqtur Of Shu

DAYR BUQTUR OF SHU This monastery, of which nothing remains but the church rebuilt in the sixteenth century, is situated on the right bank of the Nile about 3 miles (5 km) north of Abnub, in the direction of DAYR AL-JABRAWI. It is dedicated to Saint VICTOR (Buqtur), a soldier in the fort of Shu …

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Monastery Of St. Antony

MONASTERY OF ST. ANTONY It is located at the foot of the Wadi Araba near the Red Sea. The monastery is named after the famous figure of monasticism, St. Antony. Probably in the second half of the fourth century a monastic community gathered around the site where the saint lived. Historian Sulpicius Severus (ca. 360-420) …

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Monastery Of St. Paul

MONASTERY OF ST. PAUL It is located about 39 kilometers southwest of the Red Sea lighthouse station of Za’farana. St. Paul, who is known as the “first hermit,” is presumably Paul of Thebes, whose biography was composed by St. Jerome, probably in 375 or 376. The cave church is the oldest and most venerated element …

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Patriarch Gabriel III

PATRIARCH GABRIEL III The life of the monk and priest Ghubriyāl, who eventually became Coptic patriarch Gabriel III (usually counted as the 77th patriarch, 1268–1271), bears witness to both the flourishing of literary and scientific activity as well as to the turbulence of ecclesiastical and social affairs that characterize Coptic Orthodox history in the middle decades …

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