Pachomius

Scetis

SCETIS A name that historically designated the area of monastic settlement extending about 19 miles (30 km) through the shallow valley known in the medieval period as Wad Habb, now called Wad al-Natrun, which runs southeast to northwest through the Western or Libyan Desert, about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the Nile Delta. In …

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Cornelius

CORNELIUS One of the prominent “ancient brothers” of the Pachomian koinonia (community). He belonged to the second group of disciples who came to PACHOMIUS around 324 (Lefort, Sahidic-Bohairic 24; Halkin, 1982, Greek, recension 1, 26), and he was appointed by him as father of the Monastery of Tmoushons shortly after it was received into the …

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Monasticism Bibliography

MONASTICISM BIBLIOGRAPHY Atiya, Aziz S. “Jerome.” In CE, vol. 4, 1323ff. Behlmer, Heike. “Women and the Holy in Coptic Hagiography.” In Actes du Huitieme congres international d’etudes coptes, Paris, 28 juin-3 juillet 2004, vol. 2, ed. Nathalie Bosson and Anne Boud’hors, 405-16. Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta, 163. Louvain: E. Peeters, 2007. Boutros, Ramez. “Une question de …

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Coptic Literature

COPTIC LITERATURE Comparatively little Coptic literature, which is almost entirely religious, has survived. Coptic literature flourished from the fourth to the ninth century. The 10th and the 11th centuries did not witness new literary works; literary activity was limited to editing and compiling older works. Most of the Coptic literature is written in codices, the …

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Military Costume

MILITARY COSTUME Since the Copts lived under foreign occupation or domination, which reduced them to a tolerated community, one might think that military service would not be accessible to the Copts. Nevertheless, it is known that Saint PACHOMIUS served in the army for a time in the reign of Constantine, although he was soon discharged. …

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Cycle

CYCLE One of a group of works in Coptic literature dealing with episodes in the life of one or more specific characters, mostly saints and martyrs. There are two basic types of cycle: homiletic and hagiographical. The difference lies simply in the different literary forms used, with the homiletic cycles being made up of texts …

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Spoken Coptic Language

SPOKEN COPTIC LANGUAGE Coptic was the spoken language of ancient Egypt until the ARAB CONQUEST OF EGYPT in the seventh century. It was recorded first in the hieroglyphic (sacred) script, the earliest form of Egyptian pictorial writing, and succeeded by the hieratic (priestly), which was the simplified running script, and the demotic (from “demos,” meaning …

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Cell

CELL The word cell is very common in monastic texts, but it does not always have the sense given it in Western languages. Because monks inhabited various places, such as tombs, caves, or constructed hermitages, it is necessary to distinguish between them. We find in Greek the words kella (derived from Latin) and its common …

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Coptic Church Review (CCR)

COPTIC CHURCH REVIEW (CCR) It is a quarterly journal published since 1980 by the Society of Coptic Church Studies, East Brunswick, New Jersey. Dr. Rodolph Yanney, Editor-in-Chief, founded CCR in order to address a significant void in English-language scholastic theological literature on the Coptic Church and the Coptic religious heritage. Born in 1929, Rodolph Yanney, …

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