Old Nubian

Egyptian Monasticism

EGYPTIAN MONASTICISM Christian monasticism is a distinctive form of spiritual discipline that seems to have been originated in Egypt. St. Antony, the “father of the monks,” is usually regarded as its founder. As a youth of about 18 years old, he responded to a gospel reading (Matt. 19; 21), began his hermitic life as a …

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Tafa, Or Taifa

TAFA, or Taifa In both ancient and modern times a settlement in Lower Nubia, about 30 miles (50 km) south of Aswan. In a number of classical texts it is called Taphis. Two small temples were built here in pharaonic times, and the place later became the main center of Roman military administration in Lower …

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Tamit

TAMIT The name given in modern times to the ruins of a medieval Nubian village situated on the west bank of the Nile a few miles north of the Abu Simbel temples. The ancient name of the place is nowhere recorded, for it was not large or important enough to figure in any written accounts. …

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Alwa , Or Alodia

ALWA , or Alodia The most southerly of the Christian kingdoms of medieval Nubia. Its territorial extent is unknown but was apparently considerable. According to IBN SALIM AL-ASWANI, it was larger than the neighboring kingdom of MAKOURIA. The frontier between Makouria and ‘Alwa was at AL-ABWAB (the gates), which was evidently somewhere between the Fourth …

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Griffith, Francis Llewellyn

GRIFFITH, FRANCIS LLEWELLYN (1862-1934) A British Egyptologist. As longtime professor of Egyptology at Oxford University, he was a pioneer in the study of medieval Nubian archaeology and philology. Between 1910 and 1912 he directed the excavation of several churches and other Christian archaeological remains at Faras in Lower Nubia. At Faras and at ‘Abd al-Qadir …

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Eparch Of Nobatia

EPARCH OF NOBATIA The Nubian kingdom of NOBATIA was subjugated by the larger kingdom of MAKOURIA in the seventh century. Nobatia thereafter lost its independence but not its name or separate identity. It was governed throughout the Middle Ages by a kind of viceroy, the eparch of Nobatia, who was appointed by the king of …

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