Coptic art in the Coptic museum

Coptic art in the Coptic museum Coptic art began to emerge in Egypt around 300 A.D. In form, style, and content it was quite different from the art of Pharaonic Egypt. How’ did this come about? Broadly speaking, there were two causes. The first is that indigenous Egyptian art had been in contact with the […]

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The Art of Coptic Churches

The Art of Coptic Churches WE WENT TO THE CHURCH while the elders of the monastery went with us. There were pictures of monks on the wall of the place, representing our monastic fathers: Antony the Great and Apa Pachom and Apa Paule and Apa Makarios.21 These were on one side and the archbishops of […]

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Christianity and Monasticism in al-Bahnasa according to Arabic Sources

Christianity and Monasticism in al-Bahnasa according to Arabic Sources LOCATED ABOUT two hundred kilometers south of Cairo on the western bank of Bahr Yusuf (literally, the Sea of Joseph, but actually a canal running off from the Nile), in Minya governorate, about sixteen kilometers northwest of the district of Bani Mazar, al-Bahnasa (Oxyrhynchos, or the […]

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Akhmim as a Source of Textiles

Akhmim as a Source of Textiles History of Textile Production in Akhmim According to the historian Strabo (Geography XVII, 41) Akhmim/Panopolis was a well-known production center of linen fabrics from pharaonic times. Up to now there is little literary evidence of textile manufacture in the town throughout the first millennium, the period to which most […]

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Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations Introduction Exploration of Antinoopolis—the well-known city founded by the Roman emperor Hadrian around ad 130 to honor his beloved Antinous after his legendary death in the Nile—began in the late nineteenth century.[1] In January 1896, Carl Schmidt (1868—1938), a German scholar, undertook a first small excavation in […]

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Recent Excavations at Bawit

Recent Excavations at Bawit The remains of the Bawit monastery, founded by Apa Apollo, are located near Dashlout, about twenty-five kilometers south of Hermopolis (today Ashmunayn).[1] The kom covers an area of forty hectares. Apa Apollo’s mon­astery was one of the most important monasteries of Middle Egypt and the site of Bawit has indubitably yielded […]

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Funerary Aspects in the paintings from the Apollo Monastery at Bawit

Funerary Aspects in the paintings from the Apollo Monastery at Bawit Introduction Much has been written about the monastic settlement of Bawit and it seems a daring task to try and add something substantially new to this. First of all, we have limited access to the material on which we can base our conclusions. Only […]

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The Cave of John of Lykopolis

The Cave of John of Lykopolis Gebel Asyut al-Gharbi Gebel Asyut al-Gharbi, a limestone mountain located to the west of Asyut at the edge of the Libyan Desert, provides much information on ancient Asyut (Kahl 2007a: 59—106). The mountain rises to a height of up to two hundred meters above sea level. During the pharaonic […]

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Coptic Sculpture In Stone

COPTIC SCULPTURE IN STONE Figures in the round and especially architectural ornament carved in stone and stucco in Egypt from the fourth to the seventh century. State of Research In comparison with studies on the sculpture of the late classical and early Byzantine periods in other Roman provinces (e.g., Italy, the Balkans, Greece, Asia Minor, […]

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Christian Subjects In Coptic Art

CHRISTIAN SUBJECTS IN COPTIC ART Whatever its materials and techniques—stone or wood relief sculpture, painted walls or manuscripts, textiles, metalwork, ceramics, or glass—Coptic Christian iconography retained a few rare elements of pharaonic origin and many Greco-Roman elements from Alexandrian tradition. From the fifth century on, these pagan subjects mingled with Christian motifs. The Christian subjects […]

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