The Church of St. Antony Al-Maymon (BENI SUEF)

The Church of St. Antony Al-Maymon (BENI SUEF) IN AROUND THE YEAR 285, St. Antony set out for a mountain near the Nile called Pispir, where he lived twenty years before going into isolation near the Red Sea. The present-day Dayr al-Maymun, which is situated on the east bank of the Nile about thirteen miles […]

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The Monastery of al-Ganadla (ASYUT)

The Monastery of al-Ganadla (ASYUT) THE MONASTERY OF AL-GANADLA, also called the Monastery of the Virgin (Dayr al-‘Adra), was established in pharaonic quarries to the west of the village of al-Ganadla, about 25 kilometers south of Asyut. It is often confused with the Monastery of St. Macrobius (Dayr Abu Maqrufa), a nearby laura dedicated to […]

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Recent Excavations at Bawit

Recent Excavations at Bawit The remains of the Bawit monastery, founded by Apa Apollo, are located near Dashlout, about twenty-five kilometers south of Hermopolis (today Ashmunayn).[1] The kom covers an area of forty hectares. Apa Apollo’s mon­astery was one of the most important monasteries of Middle Egypt and the site of Bawit has indubitably yielded […]

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Fig. 9. Tetraconch Church at Abu Mina

The Architecture of Coptic Churches

The Architecture of Coptic Churches THE CHRISTIANS OF EGYPT OFTEN FOUND THEMSELVES facing the monumental architecture of the pharaonic past. The grand limestone and colorful granite temple complexes of the ancient gods were still active in the first centuries under the patronage of the Roman emperors; paganism was certainly not overshadowed by the rise of […]

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Cross-In-Square

CROSS-IN-SQUARE Also called quincunx, the most important type of church building of the middle and late Byzantine periods of the Byzantine empire. It characteristically consists of an approximately square room, the naos, from which is cut out an internal cross-shaped unit by erecting four columns at the center and joining them by means of arches […]

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Church Architecture In Egypt

CHURCH ARCHITECTURE IN EGYPT Only church buildings can be considered as a confessional type of structure—like the cultic buildings of pagans, Jews, and Muslims. Churches are a specifically Christian type of architecture. All other kinds of building—including funerary structures—have no confessional ties and take the same form among Christians as among people of other faiths […]

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Castrum

CASTRUM A Roman military camp developed from the so-called marching camp, which was constructed each evening by troops on the march in accordance with a model in force throughout the Roman empire. The uniformity of the camps enabled the soldiers to find their way about and also enabled them to react with speed in the […]

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Triumphal Arche – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Triumphal Arch A triumphal arch is a freestanding structure in Roman architecture and the arch at the entrance to the apse in church architecture. From the second century A.D., the Romans built arches to commemorate some extraordinary political event or the outstanding achievements of some exalted personage. Such arches frequently stood astride a road and […]

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Triconche – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Triconch A triconch is a square, oblong, or circular room expanded on three sides by semicircular exedrae, most frequently covered by a semidome. In the oldest examples, the central room is unroofed, as in the Well of Herodes Atticus in Corinth (second century A.D.). Later it usually had a wooden saddleback or barrel-vaulted roof. Very […]

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