monastery of Saint George

Al-Ruzayqat (Armant)

AL-RUZAYQAT (Armant) A site of ruins near the modern Monastery of Saint George. Presumably these are the remains of a small monastery (popular designation: Dayr al-‘Adhra’), which was evidently already abandoned in early times. The potsherds lying around belong for the most part to the fifth and sixth centuries. The church is built of mud bricks, …

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Timotheos I

TIMOTHEOS I The Coptic archbishop of Jerusalem (1899-1925). He was born in Zaqaziq in 1865 with the name Michael. He studied Arabic and French at the school of the Frères de la Salle. He was ordained a monk in the Monastery of Saint Antony (DAYR ANBA ANTUNIYUS) in 1885. When Basilios II, archbishop of Jerusalem, …

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Fatimids And The Copts

FATIMIDS AND THE COPTS It is difficult to give a complete picture of the situation of the Copts under the Fatimid dynasty (972-1171). Generally speaking, the caliphs were very tolerant toward them, except during two very tense periods that even brought persecution: under al-HAKIM (996-1021) and during the reign of the last caliph, al-‘Adid. With …

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Coptic See Of Jerusalem

COPTIC SEE OF JERUSALEM From the beginning of the Christian era, Egypt and Egyptians have had a privileged status in Jerusalem. In the Acts of the Apostles, it is mentioned that Egyptians were among those who witnessed the descent of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost. It is also mentioned (Acts 6:9) that Alexandrians, with others, …

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Ahnas

AHNAS (Ihnas al Madinah, Ihnasyah al-Madinah, Byzantine Herakleopolis) Settlement on the site of pharaonic Nn-nswt, Ptolemaic, Roman, and Byzantine Herakleopolis. The Coptic and Arabic names go back to Egyptian Hwt-nn-nswt, Hnn-nswt, the Greek name comes from the identification of Hrj-š.f (Herishef, Greek Harsaphes), the town’s ram-headed local deity, with Heracles (Herishef was also identified with …

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