monastery of Saint Catherine

Icon of the Virgin Mary and Child. Achmim area provenance. Photo­graph courtesy of Gawdat Gabra..

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1]

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1] THE LATE FOURTEENTH-century painting by Gherardo Starnina, La Tebaide in Galleria degli Uffizi in Florence, provides perhaps the last medieval visu­alized memory of the (ideal) Christian sacred landscape along the Nile in Upper Egypt, densely inhabited by hermits tending their …

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Architectural Elements Of Churches -Index

ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS OF CHURCHES -INDEX Aisle Ambulatory Apse Atrium Baptistery Cancelli Ceiling Choir Ciborium Coffer Colonnade Column Crypt Daraj al-haykal Diaconicon Dome Elements Gallery Horseshoe arch Iconostasis Khurus Maqsurah Naos Narthex Nave Niche Pastophorium Pillare Porche Presbytery Prothyrone Prothesise Return aisle Roofe Sacristy Saddleback roof Sanctuary Shaq al-haykal Sacristye Sanctuarye Synthronone Tetraconche Tribelone Triconche Triumphal …

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Codex Sinaiticus

CODEX SINAITICUS An ancient Greek biblical text discovered in Sinai at the Monastery of Saint Catherine by Constantine Tischendorf, and consisting of 390 vellum leaves, although the original could have been at least 730 leaves. The existing parts of the manuscript include 148 leaves of the New Testament, which is complete, and 242 leaves of …

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Arsani Al-Misri

ARSANI AL-MISRI A monk at the monastery of Saint Catherine on Mount Sinai in 1396. On Thursday, 7 June 1396, he finished copying a liturgical manuscript (Sinai Arabic 220) of 215 folios, commissioned by another monk, Anba Niqula al-Jaljuli. Folios 106 to 201 were replaced and recopied at a later date by another hand. This …

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Hermitage

HERMITAGE The lodging or dwelling house of a hermit, “one living in the desert,” or anchorite, “one living far removed.” They were probably at first only single-roomed huts that were built, according to geographical circumstances, of stone, wood, or bricks; but at an early time they had already developed into houses with several rooms. Early …

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