Memphis

Anba Isaac, Bishop of the Fayoum, al-Bahnasa, and Giza, 1834-81

Anba Isaac, Bishop of the Fayoum, al-Bahnasa, and Giza, 1834-81 Anba Isaac, the bishop of the Fayoum, holds a unique place in the history of the Coptic Church during the mid-nineteenth century. This standing is due, in part, to his massive diocese, which included three Egyptian gover­norates: Giza, the Fayoum, and Beni Suef. It is …

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Memphitic

MEMPHITIC What was formerly called the Memphitic dialect (an appellation now abandoned) was one that Egyptologists and Coptologists long sought to identify and get to know, thinking that it must have been one of the principal dialects of Coptic Egypt. It was in fact known that Memphis had been one of the two very great …

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Alexandria

ALEXANDRIA Founded in 331 b.c. by Alexander the Great at the western end of the Nile Delta. An Egyptian town, Rakote, already existed there on the shore and was a fishermen’s resort. From its very beginning, Alexandria developed rapidly into one of the world’s great cities. The city replaced Memphis as the capital of Egypt …

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Dayr Al-Bala‘Yzah

DAYR AL-BALA‘YZAH History This monastery, of which nothing but vast ruins remain, was situated on the left bank of the Nile, about 11 miles (18 km) to the south of ASYUT. About 2.5 miles (4 km) from the DAYR AL- ZAWIYAH, on the cliff that carries the desert plateau, some ancient quarries were first fitted …

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Monastery Of St. Jeremiah

MONASTERY OF ST. JEREMIAH It is situated at Saqqara, the necropolis of ancient Memphis. It was founded probably in the early sixth century, flourished in the seventh and eighth centuries, and was abandoned around the middle of the ninth century. Excavated in 1906, 1910, and the 1970s, it represents one of the few communal monasteries …

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