MEDIEVAL EGYPT

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence DURING THE CONFERENCE “Perspectives on Panopolis,” which took place in Leyden in 1998, Lucia Criscuolo discussed the evidence of the Greek inscriptions, including Christian ones, from the Panopolite nome, the present-day Sohag-Akhmim area. Already in the beginning of her paper, she observed that it would …

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History Bibliography

HISTORY BIBLIOGRAPHY Adams, William Y. Nubia, Corridor to Africa. Princeton, N.J.: Allen Lane, 1977. Atiya, Aziz Suryal. “Ahl al-Dhimmah.” In CE, vol. 1, 72ff. ———. “Alexandria, Historic Churches in.” In CE, vol. 1, 92-95. ———. “Ayyubid Dynasty and the Copts.” In CE, vol. 1, 314ff. ———. “Eusebius of Caesarea.” In CE, vol. 4, 1070ff. ———. …

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Dayr Al-Baramus

DAYR AL-BARAMUS History This monastery is farthest to the northwest in the monastic colony of Wadi al-Natrun (ancient Scetis). The topographic allusions in ancient literature lend some credence to the statement by the author of the Coptic Life of Saint Macarius (probably of the eighth century; cf. Guillaumont, 1968-1969, pp. 182-83) that Dayr al-Baramus evolved …

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Patriarch Gabriel III

PATRIARCH GABRIEL III The life of the monk and priest Ghubriyāl, who eventually became Coptic patriarch Gabriel III (usually counted as the 77th patriarch, 1268–1271), bears witness to both the flourishing of literary and scientific activity as well as to the turbulence of ecclesiastical and social affairs that characterize Coptic Orthodox history in the middle decades …

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Feast Of The Martyr

FEAST OF THE MARTYR The one of the most popular feasts in Coptic and medieval Egypt, especially for its association with the Nile flood, apparently inherited from remote antiquity, when the Egyptians devoted a period of fifteen days to lavish festivities in honor of the river. The Copts celebrated it just before the occurrence of …

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Michael VI

MICHAEL VI A ninety-second patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (1476-1478). Michael (or in Arabic, Mikha’il) is briefly mentioned in the HISTORY OF THE PATRIARCHS; the dates of his investiture and his death are given, but no reference is made to the monastery from which he was chosen to occupy this ecclesiastical high office. …

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Nubian Textiles

NUBIAN TEXTILES The famous Coptic textiles of Egypt, with their elaborate woven patterns taken from Christian and classical themes, were not made in Nubia. In the earliest part of the medieval period, when Egypt was still weaving with flax and wool, the Nubians were using cotton almost exclusively. Cotton made its appearance in Nubia sometime …

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The Enaton

THE ENATON One of the chief monastic centers of Byzantine and medieval Egypt, near Alexandria. It was called in Arabic Dayr al-Zujaj (Monastery of Glass) or Dayr al-Zajjaj (Monastery of the Glass Maker). Although the whole complex of monasteries at Enaton was completely ruined at the end of the Middle Ages, numerous Greek and Oriental …

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