Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence DURING THE CONFERENCE “Perspectives on Panopolis,” which took place in Leyden in 1998, Lucia Criscuolo discussed the evidence of the Greek inscriptions, including Christian ones, from the Panopolite nome, the present-day Sohag-Akhmim area. Already in the beginning of her paper, she observed that it would […]

Read More

The Red Monastery (SOHAG)

The Red Monastery (SOHAG) THE MONASTERY OF ST. PSHAI is more commonly known as the Red Monastery (al-Dayr al-Ahmar). The historian al-Maqrizi (d. 1442) used this name, explaining that it was built of red bricks.96 Saint Pshai was a hermit and companion of St. Bigul, St. Shenute’s uncle. As a young boy, Shenute (d. ca. […]

Read More

Anba Isaac, Bishop of the Fayoum, al-Bahnasa, and Giza, 1834-81

Anba Isaac, Bishop of the Fayoum, al-Bahnasa, and Giza, 1834-81 Anba Isaac, the bishop of the Fayoum, holds a unique place in the history of the Coptic Church during the mid-nineteenth century. This standing is due, in part, to his massive diocese, which included three Egyptian gover­norates: Giza, the Fayoum, and Beni Suef. It is […]

Read More

The History of Christianity in Egypt

The History of Christianity in Egypt THE TERM COPT COMES DIRECTLY FROM THE ARABIC QBT, which appears to derive from the Greek aigyptos (Egypt) / aigyptioi (Egyptians), a phonetic corruption of the ancient Egyptian word Hikaptah, one of the names of Memphis. Initially the word described a non-Arabic-speaking non-Muslim. By implication, a Copt was also […]

Read More
Icon of the Virgin Mary and Child. Achmim area provenance. Photo­graph courtesy of Gawdat Gabra..

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1]

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1] THE LATE FOURTEENTH-century painting by Gherardo Starnina, La Tebaide in Galleria degli Uffizi in Florence, provides perhaps the last medieval visu­alized memory of the (ideal) Christian sacred landscape along the Nile in Upper Egypt, densely inhabited by hermits tending their […]

Read More

Shukrallah Jirjis (Mu‘Allim)

SHUKRALLAH JIRJIS (Mu‘allim) A Coptic contemporary of the French Expedition to Egypt and a close friend and colleague of General YA‘QUB. Though the particulars of his early life are unknown, we must assume that he was born in the first half of the eighteenth century. During French rule in Egypt, he is known to have […]

Read More

Gabriel Sidarus (1768-1851)

GABRIEL SIDARUS (1768-1851) Also called Sidarious, Sidarous, Sidarousse, or Sidarosse, military man born in Cairo. He was better known by his given name, spelled Gabrielle. He himself signed Gabriel S. He was a nephew of General YA‘QUB on both sides of his family. Sidarus started his adult life as intendant on the estates of the […]

Read More

History Bibliography

HISTORY BIBLIOGRAPHY Adams, William Y. Nubia, Corridor to Africa. Princeton, N.J.: Allen Lane, 1977. Atiya, Aziz Suryal. “Ahl al-Dhimmah.” In CE, vol. 1, 72ff. ———. “Alexandria, Historic Churches in.” In CE, vol. 1, 92-95. ———. “Ayyubid Dynasty and the Copts.” In CE, vol. 1, 314ff. ———. “Eusebius of Caesarea.” In CE, vol. 4, 1070ff. ———. […]

Read More

Yuhanna Chiftichi

YUHANNA CHIFTICHI A Coptic priest and scholar born in Cairo in the last quarter of the eighteenth century; died in France sometime after 1825. One hindrance to discovering his identity is due to the illegible spellings of his name by biographers of Champollion, to whom Chiftichi taught Coptic pronunciation. H. Hartleben (1906, Vol. 1, p. […]

Read More

Conversion To Islam

CONVERSION TO ISLAM After the Arab conquest of Egypt (640-642), the bulk of the Egyptians remained Christian in the first two centuries of Islamic rule. By the beginning of the third century of Arab occupation, however, the resistance of the Copts was broken and their economic status was dramatically weakened because of the financial burdens […]

Read More