Liturgical Instruments

Bishop

BISHOP The Coptic term episkopos is a loan word from the Greek that can be translated bishop, overseer, superintendent, or supervisor. The Arabic usquf derives also from the Greek episkopos. According to the Didascalia, the bishop should be chosen by the congregation, and his consecration should take place on a Sunday in the presence of …

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Liturgical Instruments

LITURGICAL INSTRUMENTS The patriarch or a bishop must consecrate the liturgical instruments of the Coptic Church, as well as everything worn or used during the services, as part of the general process of consecration. The liturgical instruments consist of the following: Basin and ewer: used to wash the priest’s hands before the Divine Liturgy. Candelabrum: …

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Lectern

LECTERN A four-legged wooden or metal bookstand, about 50 inches (125 cm) in height, on which the Bible and other liturgical books are placed for reading. It is often in the form of an eagle with outstretched wings. The lower part is customarily used as a storage container for books and musical instruments employed in …

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Liturgical Instruments

LITURGICAL INSTRUMENTS The liturgical instruments of the Coptic church, as well as everything worn or used during the services, must be consecrated by the patriarch or a bishop as part of the general process of CONSECRATION. Basin and Ewer A basin and ewer are usually placed on a low wooden stand at the northern side …

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Deacon

DEACON The third and lowest rank in the threefold hierarchy of orders in the Coptic church, being subordinate to the presbyter and the bishop. The term deacon, derived from the Greek diakonos, meaning “servant,” signified one who performed menial tasks such as waiting at table. It occurs in the New Testament with wider and more …

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