Isolated

THE LORD OF GLORY

THE LORD OF GLORY IN the first century it was the custom in letter writing to begin with some pious expression. ‘Gaius to Amplias, greeting. May the gods preserve you’ is the usual kind of thing. This was just as much a part of a first-century letter as our ‘Dear So-and-so’ at the beginning, and …

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ACCEPTANCE

ACCEPTANCE The noun itself is not found in the AV of the NT, though we come very near it in ‘acceptation’ (ἀποδοχή), 1 Ti 1:15; 4:9. Instances of the verb and adjective are frequent, and are mostly equivalents of δέχομαι and its derivatives, as the following list shows: δέχομαι, 2 Co 6:1; 8:17; 11:4; δεκτός, …

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Figures in the Carpet and Monastic Spirituality in the Wadi al-Natrun (Scetis)

Figures in the Carpet: Macarius the Great, Isaiah of Scetis, Daniel of Scetis, and Monastic Spirituality in the Wadi al-Natrun (Scetis) From the Fourth to the Sixth Century Not many years ago I read a very good scholarly book on Palestinian monasticism in Late Antiquity. In my review of that book I observed, however, that …

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The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts

The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts Dayr al-Bala’iza, situated at the edge of the desert on the west bank of the Nile some eighteen to nineteen kilometers south of Asyut, gained initial recognition among Coptic scholars through the large cache of manuscripts, both literary and documentary, discovered at the site during …

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Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations Introduction Exploration of Antinoopolis—the well-known city founded by the Roman emperor Hadrian around ad 130 to honor his beloved Antinous after his legendary death in the Nile—began in the late nineteenth century.[1] In January 1896, Carl Schmidt (1868—1938), a German scholar, undertook a first small excavation in …

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Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community

Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community Al-Shaykh Sa‘id (Middle Egypt) covers the southern part of the archaeo­logical concession area of the Dayr al-Barsha Project (Research Group Egyptology, KU Leuven),[1] directed by Harco Willems.[2] The site is named after the nearby tomb of a local saint. An ensemble of …

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Toward the Documentation of the Monastery of the Holy Virgin at al-Muharraq, Asyut

Toward the Documentation of the Monastery of the Holy Virgin at al-Muharraq, Asyut The site of Dayr al-Muharraq is located at the foot of the mountains of Qusqam (Coptic Syowt and present day al-Qusiya), GPS location Latitude 27.38491 Longitude 30.77989. Nothing is known for certain about the date of the foundation of this monastery (Coquin …

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Memphitic

MEMPHITIC What was formerly called the Memphitic dialect (an appellation now abandoned) was one that Egyptologists and Coptologists long sought to identify and get to know, thinking that it must have been one of the principal dialects of Coptic Egypt. It was in fact known that Memphis had been one of the two very great …

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