John of Lykopolis

John of Lykopolis As Sebastien Lenain de Tillemont observed over three centuries ago, among all the solitary saints in Egypt “there is after St. Antony no one whose renown is greater than that of St.John of Lycopolis” (Tillemont 1732, vol. 10:9). Tillemont also observed that,besides the principal accounts of john of Lykopolis found in the […]

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Celestinus Of Rome

CELESTINUS OF ROME A bishop of Rome (422-432) and the authority to whom NESTORIUS, bishop of Constantinople, and CYRIL I, bishop of Alexandria, appealed during their controversy over the term THEOTOKOS (430). Celestinus sided with Cyril, and thus caused the condemnation of Nestorius at a council held in Rome. The subsequent Council of EPHESUS later […]

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Patriarch Alexander I

PATRIARCH ALEXANDER I He was the 19th patriarch of the See of St. Mark (312-326). He succeeded Achillas in the year 312 a.d., just after the end of the great persecution. Alexander faced three problems during his episcopate. He was first troubled over the timing of the Easter observance by a schismatic faction led by […]

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Catechetical School Of Alexandria

CATECHETICAL SCHOOL OF ALEXANDRIA The first and foremost institution of theological learning in Christian antiquity. Though we first hear of it as an established school in the Historia ecclesiastica of Eusebius, around the year 180, its roots must be traced much further back. Its rise to prominence from humble beginnings must therefore have been a […]

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Sozomen (Fifth Century)

SOZOMEN (fifth century) A church historian. His full name was Hermias Sozomenus Salamanes (or Salaminius), which has misled some to associate him with the town of Salamis in Cyprus. This is a mistake, since he is known to have been born in the village of Bethelia near the town of Gaza in Palestine. His grandfather […]

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Constantine I (288?-337)

CONSTANTINE I (288?-337) The Roman emperor who allowed freedom of worship in the empire, thus ending the persecution of Christians. Flavius Valerius Constantinus (Constantine) was born to Constantius Chlorus and Helena. When his father was appointed Caesar in 293, Constantine was sent to the court of DIOCLETIAN, the senior emperor, where he later distinguished himself […]

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First Council Of Constantinople

FIRST COUNCIL OF CONSTANTINOPLE Summoned by Emperor Theodosius I and convened at Constantinople in May and June 381, and recognized as the second ecumenical council. About 150 bishops from the eastern provinces of the empire attended, to which may be added thirty-six “Macedonian” bishops, mainly from western Asia Minor, whom the emperor and the council […]

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Jerome (Ca. 349-Ca. 419)

JEROME (ca. 349-ca. 419) A Monk, biblical scholar. He was born at Strido, near Aquileia at the head of the Adriatic. He studied in Rome, where he was baptized. He devoted himself to asceticism. He moved to the Syrian Desert near Chalcis, where he began learning Hebrew and Greek with intense study of the scriptures. […]

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Sabellianism

SABELLIANISM Sabellianism is named after its originator, Sabellius from Cyrenaica. The followers of this heresy believed that God was one substance but three activities. He manifested Himself as the Father in the Old Testament, as the Son in the New Testament, and as the Holy Spirit in Church life. Dionysius of Alexandria condemned this heresy […]

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Archdeacon

ARCHDEACON The rank of archdeacon dates back to the apostolic age. Having appointed seven deacons, “men of good repute, full of the Holy Spirit and of wisdom,” the apostles selected one of them, Stephen, to be their chief (Acts 6:1-6). However, no mention is made to this particular rank in the letter written by Cornelius, […]

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