Hippolytus of Rome

Theology And Liturgy Bibliography

THEOLOGY AND LITURGY BIBLIOGRAPHY Abdallah, Alfonso. L’ordinamento Liturgico di Gabriele V-88 Patriarca Copto. Cairo: Ain Shams Press, 1962. ‘Abd al-Masih Salib al-Mas‘udi. Al-Khuulaji al-Muqaddas. Cairo: n.p., 1902. Alcock, Antony. The Life of Saint Samuel of Kalamun by Isaac the Presbyter. London: Aris & Philips, 1983. Allen, Pauline, and C. Datema. “Leontius presbyter of Constantinople.” Byzantina …

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Anathema

ANATHEMA This word occurs in the Greek New Testament in Romans 9:3 and I Corinthians 12:3. It means anything (or anyone) devoted to evil. Hence, it is considered a curse. The great curse of the Coptic Church is excommunicating a person or denouncing a doctrine or practice as damnable. This anathema is pronounced against heretics, …

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Apostolic Tradition

APOSTOLIC TRADITION The Apostolic Tradition is a book traditionally attributed to Hippolytus of Rome. This book is a mine of information about liturgy and canon law. Scholars believe that this text was composed in the year 215 a.d. The original Greek of this text is lost. However, we have a Coptic and a Copto-Arabic translation …

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Valentinus

VALENTINUS A Christian Gnostic teacher active in Alexandria in the early second century. Born in the Egyptian Delta, he was educated in Alexandria. He is reported by Irenaeus to have adapted the teachings of the Gnostic sect in creating his own system, which conformed to a greater degree to traditional Christian doctrine. Around 140 he …

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Flight Into Egypt

FLIGHT INTO EGYPT Many Coptic churches commemorate the flight into Egypt by celebrating the mass on the 24th of the Coptic month Bachons, corresponding to the first day of June. This great event is glorified in the liturgical book the Difnar and the Synaxarion of the Coptic Church. The scripture (Matt. 2:13) provides no information …

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Monarchianism

MONARCHIANISM In the dogmatic controversies during the early centuries of Christianity, some heretics denied the distinction of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit in the Trinity. Modalists denied any differences and they took their model from the monarchy in the Roman Empire, being singular. The other group of Monarchians, “the Adoptionists,” claimed that …

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