HENOTICON

Henoticon

HENOTICON When Emperor Zeno returned to Constantinople in 482, he issued his famous Henoticon to the Christians of the world in Alexandria, Egypt, Libya, and Pentapolis. In it, he confirmed the faith of the Fathers of the Councils of Nicaea and Constantinople; nothing, however, is mentioned concerning the Councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon. Zeno condemned …

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Timothy Salofaciolus

TIMOTHY SALOFACIOLUS A Chalcedonian patriarch of Alexandria (460-482). A one-time steward of the church of Alexandria, he was consecrated patriarch after the expulsion of TIMOTHY II AELURUS (“the Cat”) in 459. His nickname may be derived from Coptic with a “dog Latin” ending meaning “wearer of a white turban” or “wobbling turban.” He was the …

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Armenians And The Copts

ARMENIANS AND THE COPTS Copts and Armenians are regarded as making up the non-Chalcedonian Oriental Orthodox churches. How early they came into contact with one another is rather difficult to surmise. For various reasons (military, political, trade, slavery), Armenians have lived in Egypt since the time of the ancient Persian rule (sixth century B.C.). Through …

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Saint Hilaria

SAINT HILARIA The elder daughter of the fourth-century emperor Zeno, who according to legend became a monk (feast day: 21 Tubah). Zeno had two daughters. The legend is as follows. The elder, Hilaria, seeks the monastic life but Theopiste, the younger, does not entertain such desires. Hilaria secretly, in male attire, travels to Alexandria, where …

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John I

JOHN I Surnamed Hemula, saint and twenty-ninth patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (494-503). As a former monk from the monastery of Saint Macarius (DAYR ANBA MAQAR), he marks the beginning of the choice of patriarchs from the desert monasteries rather than from the learned clergy of Alexandria. According to the HISTORY OF THE …

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Justin I (C.450-527)

JUSTIN I (c.450-527) A byzantine emperor who worked for orthodoxy and the reunion of Rome and Constantinople. He was born about 450 in Bederiana (in modern Yugoslavia). Of peasant stock, he followed his father into the Roman army, fighting with distinction against the Isaurian rebels in 498, the Persians from 502 to 505, and the …

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Zeno

ZENO A Roman emperor (474-491). An Isaurian chieftain by birth, he came to Constantinople and in 466 or 467 married the daughter of Emperor LEO I (457-474). He changed his almost unpronounceable name, Tarasicodissa, to Zeno; and when Leo I died in February 474, he maneuvered his way into becoming a joint ruler with his …

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Monophysitism

MONOPHYSITISM The doctrine that the incarnate Christ is one Person and has one divine nature as opposed to the orthodox doctrine that he is one Person and has two natures, one human and one divine. The rift between the Monophysites, including the Coptic, Syrian, Ethiopian, and Armenian churches, and the Orthodox Church has divided Eastern …

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