Hadrian

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations Introduction Exploration of Antinoopolis—the well-known city founded by the Roman emperor Hadrian around ad 130 to honor his beloved Antinous after his legendary death in the Nile—began in the late nineteenth century.[1] In January 1896, Carl Schmidt (1868—1938), a German scholar, undertook a first small excavation in …

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations Read More »

Hexapla And Tetrapla

HEXAPLA AND TETRAPLA Origen is the first author in the Church to arrange a critical edition of the Old Testament. He organized in six columns the Hebrew text of the Old Testament, in Hebrew and Greek, and incorporated the translation of Aquila (a Jew of the time of Hadrian), and the translation of Symmachus and …

Hexapla And Tetrapla Read More »

Saint Sophia

SAINT SOPHIA [A holy woman of the fourth century or later whose remains are interred in the Church of Santa Sophia (Hagia Sophia) in Constantinople (feast day: 5 Tut). There are several versions of her story.] The Jacobite Tradition The Jacobite-Arabic SYNAXARION, preserved in a seventeenth-century copy (restored in the nineteenth century) in the National …

Saint Sophia Read More »

Saints Cosmas And Damian

SAINTS COSMAS AND DAMIAN Two doctors and brothers who suffered martyrdom at the time of the Diocletian persecutions (feast day: 22 Hatur). They were called anargyroi (silverless) because they did not ask money from the sick whom they cured. The Byzantine church, however, gradually came to distinguish three pairs of brothers named Cosmas and Damian, …

Saints Cosmas And Damian Read More »

Dayr Al-Bakhit (Luxor)

DAYR AL-BAKHIT (Luxor) History The name of this monastery could only be the Arabic transcription of a Coptic word meaning “of the north,” in contrast to Dayr al-Qibli (Monastery of the South), the name given to the temple of Hadrian to the south of Madinat Habu. This appellation could be older than the typically Arabic …

Dayr Al-Bakhit (Luxor) Read More »

Codex Justinianus

CODEX JUSTINIANUS Shortly after JUSTINIAN became emperor in 527, he began a major overhaul of the empire’s legal code. The first step in this process was the publication of the Codex Justinianus, a revision and expansion of Theodosian’s legal code. This volume was published on 7 April 529 by a commission under the direction of …

Codex Justinianus Read More »

Roman Emperors In Egypt

ROMAN EMPERORS IN EGYPT Although Alexandria never became a “Second Rome,” the existence and, in some sense, the presence of the Roman emperor was a common and permanent experience for the inhabitants of Egypt. The head of the provincial administration, the prefect of Egypt, was the direct representative of the emperor. The importance and power …

Roman Emperors In Egypt Read More »

Roman Emperors In Egypt

ROMAN TRAVELERS IN EGYPT Egypt attracted visitors from Rome and Italy as early as Ptolemaic times. The initiation of diplomatic relations between the court of the Ptolemies and Rome in 273 B.C. was followed in the second century, especially after the Roman intervention against the Seleucid Antiochus IV in 168 B.C., by an increasing influence …

Roman Emperors In Egypt Read More »