Greek inscriptions

ADOPTION

ADOPTION The term.—The custom of adopting children is explicitly alluded to by St. Paul alone of biblical writers; he uses the word ‘adoption’ (υἱοθεσία, Vulg. adoptio filiorum, Syr. usually sīmath benayā)) five times: Ro 8:15, 23; 9:4, Gal 4:5, Eph 1:5. This Greek word is not found in classical writers (though θετὸς υἱός is used …

ADOPTION Read More »

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence DURING THE CONFERENCE “Perspectives on Panopolis,” which took place in Leyden in 1998, Lucia Criscuolo discussed the evidence of the Greek inscriptions, including Christian ones, from the Panopolite nome, the present-day Sohag-Akhmim area. Already in the beginning of her paper, she observed that it would …

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence Read More »

Coptology

COPTOLOGY A scientific discipline in Oriental studies that investigates the language and culture of Egypt and Nubia in the widest sense: literature, religion, history, archaeology, and art. Its range extends from late antiquity to the Middle Ages, or even down to the present. It touches on and intersects with a number of neighboring disciplines. The …

Coptology Read More »

Al-Shaykh Hasan

AL-SHAYKH HASAN Ancient quarries situated on the right bank of the Nile, opposite and a little to the south of the town of Matay. The Greek inscriptions with their lists of fathers were first mentioned by G. Wilkinson (1843, Vol. 2, pp. 24-31), then by travel guides (Murray, Isambert, Johanne), and incompletely published by G. …

Al-Shaykh Hasan Read More »

Kellia

KELLIA History of the Site The Kellia is one of the most important and most celebrated monastic groupings in Lower Egypt. Its location long remained uncertain. In 1935 Omar Toussoun wrongly believed he had discovered its ruins near the northwest extremity of the Wadi al- Natrun. It was the exact location of the ancient Nitria …

Kellia Read More »

Axum

AXUM This small town in the Eritrean highlands (also spelled Aksum) was the earliest imperial capital of Ethiopia. Later it became, and it remains to this day, the most important center of Christian worship in the country. The first historical mention of Axum is in the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, a Greek navigator’s guide …

Axum Read More »

Al-Bagawat

AL-BAGAWAT Location and Architecture Al-Bagawat is an early Christian necropolis of the ancient town of Hibis (modern Khargah). The graves of the pagan period were arranged as rock tombs on the north and west slopes of the cliff lying to the east opposite the former town area (on the general situation, see Winlock, 1941, pl. …

Al-Bagawat Read More »

Dayr Al-Qusayr

DAYR AL-QUSAYR From this village and as far as the one called DAYR AL-JABRAWI, the Arabian or eastern mountains between the Nile and Red Sea form a massif called Jabal Abu Fudah, which borders the Nile very closely for some 9 miles (15 km). There are two monasteries there, dedicated to Saint Theodorus and Saint …

Dayr Al-Qusayr Read More »