Graf

The Monastery of the Holy Virgin Mary at al-Muharraq, Mount Qusqam: History and Heritage (Reflections of Its Monks)

The Monastery of the Holy Virgin Mary at al-Muharraq, Mount Qusqam: History and Heritage (Reflections of Its Monks) Introduction[1] The history of the Coptic Orthodox Church makes no mention of any information about the monastic community or the Holy Virgin Church in the Qusqam region until the fourteenth-century ad. The name Qusqam (al-Muharraq Monastery) is …

The Monastery of the Holy Virgin Mary at al-Muharraq, Mount Qusqam: History and Heritage (Reflections of Its Monks) Read More »

Discerning the True Religion in Late Fourteenth-Century Egypt

Discerning the True Religion in Late Fourteenth-Century Egypt: Pages from the Dayr al-Muharraq Edition of al-Hawi by al-Makin Jirjis ibn al-‘Amid Introduction In recent years, Dayr al-Muharraq has shared some of its riches with the wider world through the publication of transcriptions of manuscripts from the monastery’s library. As examples, I can point to the …

Discerning the True Religion in Late Fourteenth-Century Egypt Read More »

Notes on the Arabic Life of Ibrahim al-Fani: A Coptic Saint of the Fourteenth Century

Notes on the Arabic Life of Ibrahim al-Fani: A Coptic Saint of the Fourteenth Century The Lives of Coptic saints in the later Islamic era fall into the category of sacred biographies that have not attracted much study until recently.[1] This observation does not imply that these Lives have little or no historical or lit­erary …

Notes on the Arabic Life of Ibrahim al-Fani: A Coptic Saint of the Fourteenth Century Read More »

Cyriacus

CYRIACUS A Bishop of al-Bahnasa (Oxyrhynchus), assumed author of eight homilies. We have no historical evidence of either the existence of this person or the period in which he lived. On the latter, opinions greatly diverge: G. Graf (1944-1953, Vol. 1, p. 475) thinks that if one accepts what is said by the Ethiopian Book …

Cyriacus Read More »

Clement Caraccioli

CLEMENT CARACCIOLI A scribe of four Arabic manuscripts copied in Rome between 1712 and 1715. One of them (Vatican Library, Arabic 66) gives some autobiographical details (fol. 100) where the copyist wrote in Italian: “I Clement Caraccioli of Great Cairo, converted from Mohammedanism to the holy Catholic faith, wrote this blessed book in the Arabic …

Clement Caraccioli Read More »