Grace

ANOINTING

ANOINTING Anointing was used in antiquity in three chief connexions: (1) as a part of the toilet, to beautify, strengthen, and refresh the body; (2) medicinally; (3) as a part of religious ceremonial. From the last-named sprang (4) the use of terms of anointing in a metaphorical sense to signify, e.g., the imparting of the …

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ANGER

ANGER Human anger.—Except by the stoical mind which finds no place for strong emotion in a moral scheme, anger has been recognized as a quality which, under certain conditions and within certain limits, may not only be permissible but commendable. Its ready abuse has, however, led to its being commonly placed among the evils of …

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ANATHEMA

ANATHEMA The transliteration of a Gr. word which is used in the LXX to represent the Heb. ḥērem, ‘a person or thing devoted or set apart, under religious sanctions, for destruction’ (Lv 27:28, 29, Jos 6:17). It is capable of use in the good sense of an offering to God, but was gradually confined to …

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AMEN

AMEN The lack of a common language has always been a barrier to the mutual knowledge and intercourse of the great nations of mankind, all the more that the days when the educated men of all European nations were wont to converse in Latin have long since passed away. To a certain extent the gulf …

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ADOPTION

ADOPTION The term.—The custom of adopting children is explicitly alluded to by St. Paul alone of biblical writers; he uses the word ‘adoption’ (υἱοθεσία, Vulg. adoptio filiorum, Syr. usually sīmath benayā)) five times: Ro 8:15, 23; 9:4, Gal 4:5, Eph 1:5. This Greek word is not found in classical writers (though θετὸς υἱός is used …

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ACCOUNT

ACCOUNT It will be sufficient merely to mention the use of the verb ‘account’ (λογίζομαι) in the sense of ‘reckon,’ ‘deem,’ ‘consider’ (Ro 8:36, 1 Co 4:1, He 11:19, 2 P 3:15). Simple uses of the nonn are found in Ac 19:40, when the ‘town-clerk’ (q.v.) of Ephesus warns his fellow-citizens of the difficulty of …

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ACCESS

ACCESS This word in the Epistles of the NT is the translation of the Greek word προσαγωγή (Ro 5:2, Eph 2:18; 3:12; cf. 1 P 3:18, where the verb is used actively). It has been treated very thoroughly in DCG (s.v.). Here we shall confine ourselves to— The connotation of the word.—In classical Greek, the …

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ACCEPTANCE

ACCEPTANCE The noun itself is not found in the AV of the NT, though we come very near it in ‘acceptation’ (ἀποδοχή), 1 Ti 1:15; 4:9. Instances of the verb and adjective are frequent, and are mostly equivalents of δέχομαι and its derivatives, as the following list shows: δέχομαι, 2 Co 6:1; 8:17; 11:4; δεκτός, …

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ABSTINENCE

ABSTINENCE Introduction.—The whole of morality on its negative side may be included under Abstinence. Christian moral progress (sanctification) includes a holding fast (κατέχεσθαι) of the good, and an abstaining from (ἀπέχεσθαι) every form of evil (1 Th 5:21f.). While Christianity has general laws to distinguish the good from the bad, yet for each individual Christian …

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ABOUNDING

ABOUNDING The English word ‘abound’ in the Epistles of the NT is the translation of the Gr. words πλεονάζω and περισσεύω. There is nothing of special interest in these terms; perhaps the former has the less lofty sense, its primary connotation being that of superfluity. As used by St. Paul, however, there seems little to …

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