Exegesis

ALEXANDRIA (Ἀλεξάνδρια)

ALEXANDRIA (Ἀλεξάνδρια) The city of Alexandria almost realized Alexander the Great’s dream of ‘a city surpassing anything previously existing’ (Plutarch, Alex. xxvi.). Planned by Dinocrates under the king’s supervision, and built on a neck of land two miles wide interposed between the Mediterranean Sea and Lake Mareotis (Mariut), about 14 miles from the Canopic mouth …

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The Use of Scripture in Deciding Doctrinal Controversies

The Use of Scripture in Deciding Doctrinal Controversies It is a familiar assertion of the Roman Catholic Church that Holy Scripture is incapable of deciding doctrinal issues; hence for the establishment and preservation of unity in teaching the Church needs a visible head (caput visibile), a visible vicar of Christ (vicarium Christi), who will determine …

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The Original Text of Holy Scripture and the Translations

The Original Text of Holy Scripture and the Translations Since Scripture is intended for the use of all Christians, of whatever station, sex, age, etc. (Deut. 6:6–9; Joshua 1:8; Is. 34:16; Neh. 8:2–8; 2 Kings 23:1–2; Luke 16:29 ff.; John 5:39; 20:31; Acts 17:11: “They searched the Scriptures daily”; 2 Thess. 2:15; 1 John 1:4; …

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”Do Not Believe Every Word like the Fool . . . !” Rhetorical Strategies in Shenoute, Canon 6

”Do Not Believe Every Word like the Fool . . . !” Rhetorical Strategies in Shenoute, Canon 6 ST. SHENOUTE (flORUIT ~A.D. 385–465) is the major Coptic writer of the late fourth and fifth centuries. The idea of producing texts in Coptic was not his invention, but he brought the language to a peak of …

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Copto-Arabic Literature

COPTO-ARABIC LITERATURE This entry consists of four parts. The first addresses the origins and development of the Arabic literature of the Copts. This is followed by introductions to three Copto-Arabic literary genres—hagiography, apocalyptic, and popular catechesis—for which texts are usually of anonymous authorship, and therefore unlikely to be otherwise addressed in a dictionary arranged largely …

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Nag Hammadi Codices

NAG HAMMADI CODICES A group of 12 papyrus codices plus eight leaves dating from the fourth century and inscribed in Coptic. The manuscripts were discovered in a buried storage jar by fellahin (farmers) in 1945 some 10 kilometers from Nag Hammadi, and are now housed in the Coptic Museum in Old Cairo. Publication of the …

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