Biblical Manuscripts of the Monastery of St. Shenoute the Archimandrite

Biblical Manuscripts of the Monastery of St. Shenoute the Archimandrite THIS CHAPTER WILL deal primarily with the survey of the published biblical manuscripts that came from the library of the Monastery of St. Shenoute. In addition to the history and the state of research on the subject, I will include brief comments on the extent […]

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the Desert of Apa Shenoute: Further Thoughts on BN 68

the Desert of Apa Shenoute: Further Thoughts on BN 68 THE MANUSCRIPT KNOWN as BN Copte 68, a trilingual (Coptic-Greek- Arabic) paper codex written in the fifteenth to sixteenth centuries and containing instructions for worshipers and liturgical readings, was the object of brief notices and descriptions in the nineteenth century.[1] Hans Quecke, in 1970, was […]

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The Monastery of St. Hadra / Hatre (ASWAN)

The Monastery of St. Hadra / Hatre (ASWAN) SAINT HATRE (ANBA HADRA) WAS THE SON of Christian parents who lived as a hermit in a cave near the city. His reputation as a healer of mental and physical illness grew quickly and he was ordained bishop of Aswan under Patriarch Theophilus (385-412). Where St. Hatre’s […]

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Christianity and Monasticism in al-Bahnasa according to Arabic Sources

Christianity and Monasticism in al-Bahnasa according to Arabic Sources LOCATED ABOUT two hundred kilometers south of Cairo on the western bank of Bahr Yusuf (literally, the Sea of Joseph, but actually a canal running off from the Nile), in Minya governorate, about sixteen kilometers northwest of the district of Bani Mazar, al-Bahnasa (Oxyrhynchos, or the […]

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Recent Excavations at Bawit

Recent Excavations at Bawit The remains of the Bawit monastery, founded by Apa Apollo, are located near Dashlout, about twenty-five kilometers south of Hermopolis (today Ashmunayn).[1] The kom covers an area of forty hectares. Apa Apollo’s mon­astery was one of the most important monasteries of Middle Egypt and the site of Bawit has indubitably yielded […]

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Fig. 9. Tetraconch Church at Abu Mina

The Architecture of Coptic Churches

The Architecture of Coptic Churches THE CHRISTIANS OF EGYPT OFTEN FOUND THEMSELVES facing the monumental architecture of the pharaonic past. The grand limestone and colorful granite temple complexes of the ancient gods were still active in the first centuries under the patronage of the Roman emperors; paganism was certainly not overshadowed by the rise of […]

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Khurus, the entrance to the southern altar room. Above the entrance are two equestrian saints; on the half-column, the Virgin enthroned -with Child (eighth century).

The Monastery of the Syrians (WADI AL-NATRUN)

The Monastery of the Syrians (WADI AL-NATRUN) The monastery of the MOTHER OF GOD OF THE SYRIANS, as it has become known, was established in the sixth century, as a double monastery of the Monastery of St. Pshoi. According to tradition, a certain Marutha from Tigrit (Takrit, in present-day Iraq) bought the monastery for his […]

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Stela

STELA An upright stone slab or pillar. Today some 1,100 ornamented Christian funerary stelae from Egypt (excluding Nubia) are known, most of them distributed over many museums. The most important collections are those of the Coptic Museum in Cairo, the Greco- Roman Museum in Alexandria, the British Museum in London, the Staatlichen Museen in Berlin, […]

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Scetis

SCETIS A name that historically designated the area of monastic settlement extending about 19 miles (30 km) through the shallow valley known in the medieval period as Wad Habb, now called Wad al-Natrun, which runs southeast to northwest through the Western or Libyan Desert, about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the Nile Delta. In […]

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