Economic

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence DURING THE CONFERENCE “Perspectives on Panopolis,” which took place in Leyden in 1998, Lucia Criscuolo discussed the evidence of the Greek inscriptions, including Christian ones, from the Panopolite nome, the present-day Sohag-Akhmim area. Already in the beginning of her paper, she observed that it would …

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence Read More »

Intellectual Life in Middle Egypt: The Case of the Monastery of Bawit (Sixth-Eighth Centuries)

Intellectual Life in Middle Egypt: The Case of the Monastery of Bawit (Sixth-Eighth Centuries) THE MONASTERY OF BAWIT is located on the west bank of the Nile, on the edge of the desert. The site was excavated at the beginning of the twentieth century by a team from the Institut franais d’archeologie orientale, led by …

Intellectual Life in Middle Egypt: The Case of the Monastery of Bawit (Sixth-Eighth Centuries) Read More »

The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts

The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts Dayr al-Bala’iza, situated at the edge of the desert on the west bank of the Nile some eighteen to nineteen kilometers south of Asyut, gained initial recognition among Coptic scholars through the large cache of manuscripts, both literary and documentary, discovered at the site during …

The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts Read More »

Christianity in Asyut in Modern History

Christianity in Asyut in Modern History A Historical Introduction By the second half of the eighteenth century, Asyut had taken Girga’s place as the capital of Upper Egypt. With Muhammad ‘Ali’s interest in admin­istratively organizing Egypt’s governorates, the construction of the gover­norate building in Asyut began in 1811. In 1822, Asyut’s population was around seventeen …

Christianity in Asyut in Modern History Read More »

History Bibliography

HISTORY BIBLIOGRAPHY Adams, William Y. Nubia, Corridor to Africa. Princeton, N.J.: Allen Lane, 1977. Atiya, Aziz Suryal. “Ahl al-Dhimmah.” In CE, vol. 1, 72ff. ———. “Alexandria, Historic Churches in.” In CE, vol. 1, 92-95. ———. “Ayyubid Dynasty and the Copts.” In CE, vol. 1, 314ff. ———. “Eusebius of Caesarea.” In CE, vol. 4, 1070ff. ———. …

History Bibliography Read More »

Coptic Art

COPTIC ART Coptic art is a distinctive art associated with Christianity in Egypt. It is the richest art of the Eastern Christian arts. It appeared in the third or fourth century and began to flourish in the fifth century. Coptic art can only be understood and appreciated in the light of Egypt’s economic and social …

Coptic Art Read More »

Confraternity

CONFRATERNITY The members of the confraternity were called in Greek philoponoi (the lovers of work) or the spoudaioi (the zealots). They were lay people who undertook a variety of services: caring for the poor, building churches, and assisting in worship services. They are mentioned in the time of St. Athanasius. The canons attributed to Athanasius …

Confraternity Read More »

Conversion To Islam

CONVERSION TO ISLAM After the Arab conquest of Egypt (640-642), the bulk of the Egyptians remained Christian in the first two centuries of Islamic rule. By the beginning of the third century of Arab occupation, however, the resistance of the Copts was broken and their economic status was dramatically weakened because of the financial burdens …

Conversion To Islam Read More »