E. R. HARDY

John II

JOHN II Surnamed Niciota, saint and thirtieth patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (503-515). He was a relative of JOHN I, and formerly a hermit and monk of the ENATON monastery. He took a stronger line than his predecessor in expecting an anathema on CHALCEDON from those with whom he was in communion, although …

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Damian

DAMIAN The thirty-fifth patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (569-605). (Some sources list the beginning of his reign as 578.) He was contemporary to four Byzantine emperors, Justin II (565-578), Tiberius II (578-582), Maurice (582-602), and Phocas (602-610). During their reigns, the Byzantine rulers were distracted from the imposition of the Chalcedonian profession of …

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Peter IV

PETER IV The thirty-fourth patriarch of the See of Saint Mark. Although the HISTORY OF THE PATRIARCHS gives the dates of 567-569 for Peter’s patriarchy, some sources begin his term at 575 (see Maspero, 1923, p. 212). The death of the patriarch THEODOSIUS I in 567 was followed by nine years of confusion, during which …

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Gaianus

GAIANUS The rival patriarch of Alexandria in 537. When THEODOSIUS I, the official candidate for the patriarchate, appeared for his enthronement, a popular movement of all classes in the city swept Gaianus, who had been an archdeacon under TIMOTHY III, into his place. Against the Severianism (see SEVERIAN OF JABALAH) of Theodosius, Gaianus represented the …

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Melitius

MELITIUS A fourth-century schismatic bishop of Lycopolis. Little is known about Melitius (also spelled Meletius), bishop of Lycopolis (ASYUT) in Upper Egypt, until he became involved in a dispute with PETER I, bishop of Alexandria. DIOCLETIAN’s persecution of Christians (beginning in 303) raised the question of how to treat lapsed Christians who wanted to rejoin …

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Dioscorus II

DIOSCORUS II The thirty-first patriarch of the See of Saint Mark (515-517). A nephew of TIMOTHY II Aelurus, Dioscorus II had a brief but dramatic reign. He was first installed under the auspices of the government authorities, but when this roused protests, he secured a more proper ecclesiastical enthronement. Nevertheless, riots followed in which the …

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