Decorative

The Red Monastery (SOHAG)

The Red Monastery (SOHAG) THE MONASTERY OF ST. PSHAI is more commonly known as the Red Monastery (al-Dayr al-Ahmar). The historian al-Maqrizi (d. 1442) used this name, explaining that it was built of red bricks.96 Saint Pshai was a hermit and companion of St. Bigul, St. Shenute’s uncle. As a young boy, Shenute (d. ca. …

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Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations

Children’s Burials from Antinoopolis: Discoveries from Recent Excavations Introduction Exploration of Antinoopolis—the well-known city founded by the Roman emperor Hadrian around ad 130 to honor his beloved Antinous after his legendary death in the Nile—began in the late nineteenth century.[1] In January 1896, Carl Schmidt (1868—1938), a German scholar, undertook a first small excavation in …

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Funerary Aspects in the paintings from the Apollo Monastery at Bawit

Funerary Aspects in the paintings from the Apollo Monastery at Bawit Introduction Much has been written about the monastic settlement of Bawit and it seems a daring task to try and add something substantially new to this. First of all, we have limited access to the material on which we can base our conclusions. Only …

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Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community

Al-Shaykh Sa’id Revisited: A Reassessment of the Spatial Layout of a Monastic Community Al-Shaykh Sa‘id (Middle Egypt) covers the southern part of the archaeo­logical concession area of the Dayr al-Barsha Project (Research Group Egyptology, KU Leuven),[1] directed by Harco Willems.[2] The site is named after the nearby tomb of a local saint. An ensemble of …

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Icon of the Virgin Mary and Child. Achmim area provenance. Photo­graph courtesy of Gawdat Gabra..

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1]

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1] THE LATE FOURTEENTH-century painting by Gherardo Starnina, La Tebaide in Galleria degli Uffizi in Florence, provides perhaps the last medieval visu­alized memory of the (ideal) Christian sacred landscape along the Nile in Upper Egypt, densely inhabited by hermits tending their …

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