DAYR APA JEREMIAH

Memphis

MEMPHIS The Greek name of the city known in Egyptian as Mennufer and in Coptic as membe or menf (variant spellings of the name abound in Coptic documents). The city was one of the most populous places in ancient Egypt and played an important part in the administrative and religious life of the Egyptian people. …

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Monastery Paintings, Coptic

MONASTERY PAINTINGS, COPTIC The Egyptian desert was a nurturing ground for monasteries, some of which have been occupied almost continuously since their founding. Others, abandoned and buried in sand through the centuries, have been uncovered only in recent years. Still, others, mentioned in Arabic texts or in accounts of European travelers, await excavation. Those monasteries …

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Onophrius, Saint

ONOPHRIUS, SAINT Anchorite (feast day: 16 Ba’unah). The figure of Saint Onophrius (in Arabic Abu Nufar) enjoyed the widest diffusion among the Egyptian desert fathers both in religious literature and in worship and art, both in Egypt and outside. His life was not transmitted independently, but inserted with others into a pilgrimage narrative destined for …

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Coptic Music

COPTIC MUSIC  Description of the Corpus and Present Musical Practice The following remarks pertain only to the music of the Coptic Orthodox Church. Other Christian churches in Egypt (Greek Orthodox, Coptic Catholic, Protestant, etc.) have their own musical practices. Coptic music, an expression of a proud and constant faith, still lives today among the Copts …

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Icons, Coptic

ICONS, COPTIC Holy panel paintings of Christ, the Virgin Mary, saints, or subjects from the Old and New Testaments. The word icon is derived from the Greek word eikon, meaning “image” or “portrait.” Icons are symbols of the invisible presence of Christ, the Virgin Mary, and the saints. They are the connection between the church …

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Inscriptions

INSCRIPTIONS Writing on long-lasting materials. Inscriptions, like texts written on papyrus (see PAPYROLOGY), are important primary sources of information about a society. In Egypt they appear on stone, plaster, clay, wood, metal, and textiles. They may be scratched, carved, engraved, stamped, painted or inked, or woven. Those written on clay sherds or limestone fragments are …

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