Coptic Community

The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts

The Monastery of Apollo at Bala’iza and Its Literary Texts Dayr al-Bala’iza, situated at the edge of the desert on the west bank of the Nile some eighteen to nineteen kilometers south of Asyut, gained initial recognition among Coptic scholars through the large cache of manuscripts, both literary and documentary, discovered at the site during …

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Christianity in Asyut in Modern History

Christianity in Asyut in Modern History A Historical Introduction By the second half of the eighteenth century, Asyut had taken Girga’s place as the capital of Upper Egypt. With Muhammad ‘Ali’s interest in admin­istratively organizing Egypt’s governorates, the construction of the gover­norate building in Asyut began in 1811. In 1822, Asyut’s population was around seventeen …

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Discerning the True Religion in Late Fourteenth-Century Egypt

Discerning the True Religion in Late Fourteenth-Century Egypt: Pages from the Dayr al-Muharraq Edition of al-Hawi by al-Makin Jirjis ibn al-‘Amid Introduction In recent years, Dayr al-Muharraq has shared some of its riches with the wider world through the publication of transcriptions of manuscripts from the monastery’s library. As examples, I can point to the …

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Notes on the Arabic Life of Ibrahim al-Fani: A Coptic Saint of the Fourteenth Century

Notes on the Arabic Life of Ibrahim al-Fani: A Coptic Saint of the Fourteenth Century The Lives of Coptic saints in the later Islamic era fall into the category of sacred biographies that have not attracted much study until recently.[1] This observation does not imply that these Lives have little or no historical or lit­erary …

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Abarkah

ABARKAH Eucharistic wine. An Arabic corruption of the Greek word aparche, which means “beginning of a sacrifice” or “first fruit.” Coptic tradition uses this word for the Eucharistic wine in order to highlight the symbolism of Christ as our sacrifice and the first raised among mankind. This wine is either made from dried raisins or …

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Copto-Arabic Literature

COPTO-ARABIC LITERATURE This entry consists of four parts. The first addresses the origins and development of the Arabic literature of the Copts. This is followed by introductions to three Copto-Arabic literary genres—hagiography, apocalyptic, and popular catechesis—for which texts are usually of anonymous authorship, and therefore unlikely to be otherwise addressed in a dictionary arranged largely …

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Copts In The Diaspora

COPTS IN THE DIASPORA The largest communities of Coptic emigrants are in the United Stated, Canada, and Australia. Statistics concerning their population are unavailable. However, according to unofficial sources, they number between 400,000 and 1,000,000. A considerable number of the Copts left Egypt for the West because of discrimination; others left because of the nationalization …

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Al-Mu’taman Ibn Al-‘Assal (?-Last Quarter Of 13th C.).

AL-MU’TAMAN IBN AL-‘ASSAL (?-last quarter of 13th c.). A Priest, theologian, encyclopedist. Al-Mu’taman Abu Ishaq Ibrahim ibn al-‘Assal was probably the youngest of the three authors of the Awlad al-‘Assal, and he is the one whose life is best known to us, thanks now in part to the investigations of Wadi Abullif (see the bibliography). …

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