Coptic-Arabic

Icon of the Virgin Mary and Child. Achmim area provenance. Photo­graph courtesy of Gawdat Gabra..

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1]

Toward an Understanding of the ‘Akhmim Style’ Icons and Ciboria: the Indigenous and the Foreign[1] THE LATE FOURTEENTH-century painting by Gherardo Starnina, La Tebaide in Galleria degli Uffizi in Florence, provides perhaps the last medieval visu­alized memory of the (ideal) Christian sacred landscape along the Nile in Upper Egypt, densely inhabited by hermits tending their …

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Coptology

COPTOLOGY A scientific discipline in Oriental studies that investigates the language and culture of Egypt and Nubia in the widest sense: literature, religion, history, archaeology, and art. Its range extends from late antiquity to the Middle Ages, or even down to the present. It touches on and intersects with a number of neighboring disciplines. The …

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Coptological Studies

COPTOLOGICAL STUDIES Coptological studies may be divided into several periods. The oldest began in the first Christian centuries, when the Greek alphabet with the additional letters from demotic was used to elevate the spoken Egyptian language into a written language. This made it possible for many Egyptians to read the Old and New Testaments or …

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Apostolic Canons

APOSTOLIC CANONS A series of eighty-four or eighty-five canons that in Greek form the concluding chapter (47) of Book 8 of the Apostolic Constitutions (Funk, 1905, Vol. 1, pp. 564-94). The Sahidic Coptic version counts seventy-one canons, the Arabic series (Book 2 of the 127 Canons of the Apostles) fifty-six only, the same as the …

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Book Of Canonical Hours

BOOK OF CANONICAL HOURS The first Christians followed the Jewish tradition of praying at fixed times of the day. The prayers for the third, sixth, and ninth hours may have been adopted first in Egypt, where the Jews who converted to Christianity followed the Jewish custom. In the third century, Clement of Alexandria (ca. 150-ca. …

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Al-Mu’taman Ibn Al-‘Assal (?-Last Quarter Of 13th C.).

AL-MU’TAMAN IBN AL-‘ASSAL (?-last quarter of 13th c.). A Priest, theologian, encyclopedist. Al-Mu’taman Abu Ishaq Ibrahim ibn al-‘Assal was probably the youngest of the three authors of the Awlad al-‘Assal, and he is the one whose life is best known to us, thanks now in part to the investigations of Wadi Abullif (see the bibliography). …

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Al-Nushu’ Abu Shakir Ibn Al-Rahib (Ca. 1210-Ca. 1290).

AL-NUSHU’ ABU SHAKIR IBN AL-RAHIB (ca. 1210-ca. 1290). Encyclopedist, historian, theologian, scholar of Coptic. The Coptic polymath Nushu’ al-Khilafa Abu Shakir, known as Ibn al-Rahib (“Son of the Monk”), was the son of al-Shaykh al-Sana’ Abu al-Majd, a high-ranking civil servant who became a monk and who provided leadership to the Coptic Orthodox Church during …

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Saints Cosmas And Damian

SAINTS COSMAS AND DAMIAN Two doctors and brothers who suffered martyrdom at the time of the Diocletian persecutions (feast day: 22 Hatur). They were called anargyroi (silverless) because they did not ask money from the sick whom they cured. The Byzantine church, however, gradually came to distinguish three pairs of brothers named Cosmas and Damian, …

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