Constantinople

Dioscorus Of Aphrodito

DIOSCORUS OF APHRODITO (c. 520-after 585), Jurist and poet. Born to Hellenized Coptic gentry in the Upper Egyptian town of Aphrodite (later spelled Aphrodito) in the Antaeopolite nome, Dioscorus received the classical education of his time and station plus training in the law and, presumably at Alexandria,   in philosophy (most likely under John Philoponus). He …

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Ahnas

AHNAS (Ihnas al Madinah, Ihnasyah al-Madinah, Byzantine Herakleopolis) Settlement on the site of pharaonic Nn-nswt, Ptolemaic, Roman, and Byzantine Herakleopolis. The Coptic and Arabic names go back to Egyptian Hwt-nn-nswt, Hnn-nswt, the Greek name comes from the identification of Hrj-š.f (Herishef, Greek Harsaphes), the town’s ram-headed local deity, with Heracles (Herishef was also identified with …

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Acephaloi

ACEPHALOI Extremist anti-Chalcedonians in Egypt who refused to recognize the Alexandrian patriarchs who accepted the HENOTICON. They first appear in history in 482 as Egyptian monks who opposed PETER III MONGUS’s rapprochement with Constantinople (Zacharias Rhetor Historia ecclesiastica 6. 2). Their name denoted their community of purpose without the need of a personal leader, and …

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Acacian Schism

ACACIAN SCHISM, rupture of communion between Rome and Constantinople in the period 484-519. Behind the dispute between the two sees lay issues concerning the relations of both with Alexandria and diverging attitudes toward the Council of CHALCEDON. The death of TIMOTHY II AELURUS (“the Cat”), the anti-Chalcedonian patriarch of Alexandria, failed to end the schism …

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Abu Al-Makarim

ABU AL-MAKARIM Al-Shaykh al-Mu’taman Abu al-Makarim Sa‘d-Allah Jirjis ibn Mas‘ud was a priest of the Coptic church with the title of qummus (HEGUMENOS) who lived in the thirteenth century. He is best known as the author of the famous work entitled Tarikh al-Kana’is wa-al-Adyirah (History of Churches and Monasteries), which he is known to have …

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Abraham Of Farshut

ABRAHAM OF FARSHUT A sixth-century abbot (feast day: 24 Tubah). In addition to the SYNAXARION (Basset, 1916, p. 684; Forget, 1953-1954, 47-49, pp. 411-13 [text]; 78, pp. 401-05 [trans.]), which gives a brief résumé of his life, numerous Coptic folios (Campagnano, 1970, pp. 230-32, 239-41) contain the remains of two Encomia. Moreover, we have also …

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Abbot

ABBOT. In the ancient monastic sources (APOPHTHEGMATA PATRUM, HISTORIA MONACHORUM IN AEGYPTO, PALLADIUS Historia Lausiaca, etc.), the name of a monk is generally preceded by the Greek word abbas or abba, the cognate of the Coptic apa (Sahidic) or abba (Bohairic), the Arabic aba or anba. This is clearly the Aramaic and Syriac ab in …

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