Conquest

History Bibliography

HISTORY BIBLIOGRAPHY Adams, William Y. Nubia, Corridor to Africa. Princeton, N.J.: Allen Lane, 1977. Atiya, Aziz Suryal. “Ahl al-Dhimmah.” In CE, vol. 1, 72ff. ———. “Alexandria, Historic Churches in.” In CE, vol. 1, 92-95. ———. “Ayyubid Dynasty and the Copts.” In CE, vol. 1, 314ff. ———. “Eusebius of Caesarea.” In CE, vol. 4, 1070ff. ———. …

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Greek Transcriptions

GREEK TRANSCRIPTIONS The rendering of Egyptian proper names into Greek characters was a first step toward the writing of Egyptian in an alphabetical script, that is, toward the creation of the Coptic script (see PRE-COPTIC). These proper names are mainly thousands of Egyptian anthroponyms, toponyms, and temple names, as well as names of gods, divine …

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Mo‘Allaqa

MO‘ALLAQA The Church of the Holy Virgin is known as al-Mo‘allaqa, “the Suspended One,” because it was built upon the south gate of the Babylon fortress in Old Cairo. It is the most famous ancient church in Cairo. The church was erected after the Arab conquest of Egypt (640-642). We know from the biography of …

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Pre-Coptic

PRE-COPTIC This general term indicates different stages of script or script forms that to a greater or lesser extent prepared or influenced the creation of the Coptic script. Since the use of the Greek alphabet is essential to the definition of Coptic, it is obvious that one must go back to the first more or …

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Alexandria

ALEXANDRIA Founded in 331 b.c. by Alexander the Great at the western end of the Nile Delta. An Egyptian town, Rakote, already existed there on the shore and was a fishermen’s resort. From its very beginning, Alexandria developed rapidly into one of the world’s great cities. The city replaced Memphis as the capital of Egypt …

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Conversion To Islam

CONVERSION TO ISLAM After the Arab conquest of Egypt (640-642), the bulk of the Egyptians remained Christian in the first two centuries of Islamic rule. By the beginning of the third century of Arab occupation, however, the resistance of the Copts was broken and their economic status was dramatically weakened because of the financial burdens …

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Copt

COPT The term “Copt” and the adjective “Coptic” are derived from the Arabic qibt, which in turn is a corruption of the Greek term for the indigenous population of Egypt (Agyptos and Aigyptioi). Initially, after the Arab conquest of Egypt (639-641), the new rulers of the country used the word as a designation for the …

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Copto-Arabic Literature

COPTO-ARABIC LITERATURE This entry consists of four parts. The first addresses the origins and development of the Arabic literature of the Copts. This is followed by introductions to three Copto-Arabic literary genres—hagiography, apocalyptic, and popular catechesis—for which texts are usually of anonymous authorship, and therefore unlikely to be otherwise addressed in a dictionary arranged largely …

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