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Yuhanna Al-Maqsi

YUHANNA AL-MAQSI A fourteenth-century hieromonk at DAYR AL-BARAMUS in the Wadi al-Natrun. Yuhanna lived for a certain period at DAYR AL-QUSAYR, which was situated at Turah about 15 miles (24 km) south of Old Cairo at a monastery he calls “the mount of Saint Arsenios, known as the “cells.’” It was there in 1329 that …

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Arsani Al-Misri

ARSANI AL-MISRI A monk at the monastery of Saint Catherine on Mount Sinai in 1396. On Thursday, 7 June 1396, he finished copying a liturgical manuscript (Sinai Arabic 220) of 215 folios, commissioned by another monk, Anba Niqula al-Jaljuli. Folios 106 to 201 were replaced and recopied at a later date by another hand. This …

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Three Stelae Of Seth

THREE STELAE OF SETH The Three Stelae (Codex VII, tractate 5, of the NAG HAMMADI LIBRARY) belongs to a group of tractates associated with Sethianism. Seth is the third son of Adam and Eve (Gn. 4: 25-26), appointed as another seed in place of Abel. The Three Stelae of Seth is a series of hymnic …

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Ashmun

ASHMUN A city in the Nile Delta in the Minufiyyah Province 23 miles (about 37 km) northwest of Cairo. It appears in Coptic documents with the name [moumi (Gjmoumi). In older Arabic sources it is known as Ashmun al-Juraysat. In his encomium of MACROBIUS (who preceded him as bishop of NIKIOU) Bishop Mena of Nikiou …

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Ibn Al-Sa’igh

IBN AL-SA’IGH A nickname, meaning “son of the goldsmith,” given to two Copts in references of the fourteenth century. They are probably the same person. In 1325-1326 the monk Tuma ibn al-Sa’igh copied a manuscript of the four Gospels translated from the Greek. This manuscript was in Jerusalem in 1903, at the Copts’ Dayr Mar …

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Asyut

ASYUT A city on the west bank of the Nile in middle Egypt. The Greeks called the city lÚkwn pÒlij, Lúkon pólis (Lycopolis, “wolf city”) because of the citizens’ reverence for Wepwawet, the wolf god. Asyut, the city’s modern Arabic name, is derived from the Coptic cioout. Lycopolis, home of a Christian community since at …

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Ethiopian Synaxarion

ETHIOPIAN SYNAXARION There are two reasons for an article on the Ethiopic Synaxarion to be in a Coptic encyclopedia: first, the Ethiopic Synaxarion contains historical notices about Egypt—for example, the patriarchs or the churches of Old Cairo, based on lost documents; and, second, the Egyptian edition of the Coptic SYNAXARION by the qummus ‘Abd al-Masih …

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