Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence DURING THE CONFERENCE “Perspectives on Panopolis,” which took place in Leyden in 1998, Lucia Criscuolo discussed the evidence of the Greek inscriptions, including Christian ones, from the Panopolite nome, the present-day Sohag-Akhmim area. Already in the beginning of her paper, she observed that it would […]

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Christianity and Monasticism in al-Bahnasa according to Arabic Sources

Christianity and Monasticism in al-Bahnasa according to Arabic Sources LOCATED ABOUT two hundred kilometers south of Cairo on the western bank of Bahr Yusuf (literally, the Sea of Joseph, but actually a canal running off from the Nile), in Minya governorate, about sixteen kilometers northwest of the district of Bani Mazar, al-Bahnasa (Oxyrhynchos, or the […]

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Liturgy of the Monastery of al-Muharraq

Liturgy of the Monastery of al-Muharraq The Monastery of al-Muharraq has special peculiarities in its liturgical practice.[1] For example, the term used there for ‘hymn’ is different from all other manuscripts: luhunat, rather than alhan. There are even differences in the musical instruments, as the monks of the Monastery of al-Muharraq use, in addition to […]

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The high priest Aaron (right) and his brother Moses, receiving the Tablets of the Law (east part of octagon). A deesis (Christ accompanied by his mother Mary and St. John the Baptist, both interceding for mankind) is painted below.

The Monastery of St. Macarius (WADI AL-NATRUN)

The Monastery of St. Macarius (WADI AL-NATRUN) THE FOUNDING FATHER OF THE MONASTERY ST. MACARIUS (Anba Maqar, ca. 300-390) was one of the first hermits in Wadi al-Natrun. According to his vita, a cherub took him by the hand and showed him the place where he should build cells and a church. This site must […]

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Seth

SETH A eighth-century archimandrite of Apa Shenute. Both the HISTORY OF THE PATRIARCHS and the SYNAXARION of the Copts tell us very little about Seth. We know only that he was archimandrite of the White Monastery (DAYR ANBA SHINUDAH) at the beginning of the eighth century. The Synaxarion calls him “the greatest of the abbots […]

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Cycle

CYCLE One of a group of works in Coptic literature dealing with episodes in the life of one or more specific characters, mostly saints and martyrs. There are two basic types of cycle: homiletic and hagiographical. The difference lies simply in the different literary forms used, with the homiletic cycles being made up of texts […]

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Unction Of The Sick

UNCTION OF THE SICK Holy Sacrament. Apart from its use at home for a sick person, this service is performed publicly once a year on the last Friday of Lent, two days before Palm Sunday, using the tunes of Sundays during Lent. However, in Lower Egypt this sacrament was performed on the sixth Sunday of […]

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Architectural Elements Of Churches -Index

ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS OF CHURCHES -INDEX Aisle Ambulatory Apse Atrium Baptistery Cancelli Ceiling Choir Ciborium Coffer Colonnade Column Crypt Daraj al-haykal Diaconicon Dome Elements Gallery Horseshoe arch Iconostasis Khurus Maqsurah Naos Narthex Nave Niche Pastophorium Pillare Porche Presbytery Prothyrone Prothesise Return aisle Roofe Sacristy Saddleback roof Sanctuary Shaq al-haykal Sacristye Sanctuarye Synthronone Tetraconche Tribelone Triconche Triumphal […]

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Narthex – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Narthex A narthex is a vestibule of a church, corresponding to the pronaos (porch) of a classical temple. The Greek word means literally “a reedlike plant.” In the sixth century, Procopius of Caesarea, evidently for the first time, described the antechamber of a church as a narthex because it was small (Procopius De aedificiis 1.4.7, […]

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History Of The Coptic Music

History of the COPTIC MUSIC Possible Sources and Antecedents There are three primary traditions from which Coptic music very likely absorbed elements in varying proportions: the Jewish, the Greek, and the ancient Egyptian. Possible Jewish Influence. Many aspects of the Jewish services were adopted by the Christian church in Egypt. As elsewhere in the primitive […]

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