Some Aspects of Volume 8 of Shenoute’s Canons

Some Aspects of Volume 8 of Shenoute’s Canons AS A MEMBER of the international project to edit the works of Shenoute, directed by Professor Stephen Emmel, I am responsible for editing and translating volume 8 of Shenoute’s Canons. From a certain point of view this is a real opportunity, because the amount of surviving text […]

Read More

Copto-Arabic Studies Bibliography

COPTO-ARABIC STUDIES BIBLIOGRAPHY General References (Referred to Below in Abbreviated Fashion) Atiya, Aziz Suryal, ed. The Coptic Encyclopedia, 8 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1991. A standard tool in English. (CE) Gibb, H. A. R. et al., eds. The Encyclopaedia of Islam, new ed., 11 vols. Leiden: Brill, 1954-. Some articles are of importance to Copto-Arabic […]

Read More

The Place of Qusqam in the Textual Data on the Flight into Egypt

The Place of Qusqam in the Textual Data on the Flight into Egypt Dayr al-Muharraq is for Christian Egyptians a very blessed place— maybe the most blessed place in Egypt. Tens of thousands of people come here every year on special feasts and occasions: not only for the feast of the Assumption of the Virgin […]

Read More

L* as a Secret Language: Social Functions of Early Coptic

L* as a Secret Language: Social Functions of Early Coptic Introduction The aim of the present chapter is to reconsider the use of Coptic as attested in the texts belonging to the Manichaean community in Kellis (Ismant al- Kharab, Dakhla Oasis). For this particular variety of Coptic, the siglum L* has been suggested by W-P. […]

Read More

Church Art

CHURCH ART In Coptic churches, the apse rounds the haykal (sanctuary) off at the east, the direction the Christian faces to pray. For this reason the apse was one of the first parts of the church building to be decorated, and its iconography had specific requirements, partly inspired by the liturgy itself. Although a complete […]

Read More

Copto-Arabic Literature

COPTO-ARABIC LITERATURE This entry consists of four parts. The first addresses the origins and development of the Arabic literature of the Copts. This is followed by introductions to three Copto-Arabic literary genres—hagiography, apocalyptic, and popular catechesis—for which texts are usually of anonymous authorship, and therefore unlikely to be otherwise addressed in a dictionary arranged largely […]

Read More

Al-Suqa‘I Fadl Allah Ibn Fakhr

AL-SUQA‘I FADL ALLAH IBN FAKHR A thirteenth-century historian and biographer, a Christian resident of the city of Damascus. He was a scribe in the diwan (government office). He died a centenarian in 1326. In Christian literature, he was noted for his compilation of the four Gospels in a unified work in numerous languages including Hebrew, […]

Read More

‘Abd Al-Masih Al-Isra’ili (Late 10th C.)

‘ABD AL-MASIH AL-ISRA’ILI (late 10th c.) An Apologist. According to the title of his Book of Induction (Kitab al-istidlal), ‘Abd al-Masih was a Jew of al-Raqqah who was led to Christianity by the famous Christian physician Mansur ibn Sahlan (d. ca. 1004), who flourished under the early Fatimid caliphs. A precis (by Samir Khalil, “‘Abd […]

Read More

Awlad Al-‘Assal (13th C.)

AWLAD AL-‘ASSAL (13th c.) Family of scholars. The term Awlad al-‘Assal (“the children of al-‘Assal”) is conventionally used to refer to four brothers who played a major role in the revival of Coptic thought in the decades between 1230 and 1260. Their father, Fakhr al-Dawlah (“Pride of the State”) Abu al-Mufaddal al-As‘ad, was a wealthy […]

Read More

Shams Al-Ri’asa Abu Al-Barakat Ibn Kabar (?-1324)

SHAMS AL-RI’ASA ABU AL-BARAKAT IBN KABAR (?-1324) A Priest, encyclopedist, scholar of Coptic. The writer known to contemporaries as al-Shams ibn Kabar provides one of the last great examples of the flowering of Arabic-language Coptic Orthodox literature in the 13th and early 14th centuries. Ibn Kabar served for a time as scribe to the Mamluk […]

Read More