Chiefly

ALLEGORY

ALLEGORY The word is derived from the Greek ἀλληγορία, used of a mode of speech which implies more than is expressed by the ordinary meaning of the language. This method of interpreting literature was practised at an early date and among different peoples. When ideas of a primitive age were no longer tenable, respect for …

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ADMONITION

ADMONITION Obedience to God’s law and submission to His will are essential for progressive spiritual life. Human nature being what it is, there is need for constant admonition (2 P 1:10–21). In the NT reference is made to this subject in its family, professional, and Divine aspects. νουθετέω and νουθεσία (a later form for νουθέτησις) …

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ACCESS

ACCESS This word in the Epistles of the NT is the translation of the Greek word προσαγωγή (Ro 5:2, Eph 2:18; 3:12; cf. 1 P 3:18, where the verb is used actively). It has been treated very thoroughly in DCG (s.v.). Here we shall confine ourselves to— The connotation of the word.—In classical Greek, the …

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AARON

AARON By name Aaron is mentioned in the NT only by St. Luke (Lk 1:5, Ac 7:40) and by the writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews (5:4; 7:11; 9:4), and in his personal history very little interest is taken. Officially, he was represented to be the first of a long line of high priests, …

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”Do Not Believe Every Word like the Fool . . . !” Rhetorical Strategies in Shenoute, Canon 6

”Do Not Believe Every Word like the Fool . . . !” Rhetorical Strategies in Shenoute, Canon 6 ST. SHENOUTE (flORUIT ~A.D. 385–465) is the major Coptic writer of the late fourth and fifth centuries. The idea of producing texts in Coptic was not his invention, but he brought the language to a peak of …

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Dictionaries

DICTIONARIES From the time when the Copts, like other nations or linguistic entities, felt the need to have at their disposal in writing the equivalents, exact or approximate, of the words of their language, attempts were made to compose modest lists of bilingual vocabulary; these may justly be considered the ancestors of modern Coptic dictionaries. …

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